Feeds

When Dilbert came to Nokia

Fascinating report shows how bureaucratic fear sealed company's fate in 2003

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

There's plenty here that will ring true to Nokia loyalists over the past five years. As the journalist Mikko-Pekka Heikkinen notes, Nokians fought each other harder than they fought the competition. One example we commented on at the time was the battle between N and E series, each the output of competing MultiMedia and Enterprise fiefdoms.

Until OPK finally called time on the scrap, the enterprise E series phones were denied the best imaging features of the consumer multimedia range. The N series users were denied MailForExchange, and SIP functionality. Yet many N series customers also used their phones for business, at enterprises with Microsoft Exchange corporate email, and they made use of VoIP.

Nokia's core best-selling line S40 was neglected. Several Nokians have pointed this out to us - in internal commuications, the company lauded its high-end Symbian multimedia devices but barely acknowledged the success of its feature phones, which brought home the revenue.

One wrote to us recently:

"About four years ago one of the S40 'phones achieved a major feature milestone and got one lacklustre paragraph in the internal newsletter; by comparison an S60 offering had been reduced from a ridiculously high Field Failure Rate to something just risibly high. But from the pages of congratulatory wanking you'd have thought that the damn thing had achieved sentience."

It's telling how many products Nokia released during 2006 and 2008 which were almost great, but which had correctable flaws - and how these died of neglect once on the market. Many of these devices had one feature in particular that could have brought wider success with just a small revision. A product-focused company would do this, but a matrix-focused one wouldn't - it was an extra cost.

One example is the Symbian-based 6220 Classic phone. This was a small, fast, functional and competitively priced phone, and also had a Xenon flash, giving much greater depth and quality in dark conditions - a rare feature that imaging customers cried out for. But it also had a hard-to-use and unreliable keypad, which broke frequently. A tweak to the keyboard would have helped - and would certainly have been introduced after a few weeks in the old Nokia organisation, based around product teams who took a real pride in their work.

The portfolio culture has also resulted in some inexplicable design decisions that ripple across today's handsets. Between the end of 2007 and autumn 2008, two of Nokia's most successful and popular enterprise phones - the E51 and E71 - were released. The design was a large part of their success. But for an encore, in 2009 Nokia released successors with a severe design defect, the E52 and E72.

Both phones feature a "Backspace" key perched precariously over the right softkey on one side, and the "Terminate Call" key on the other. It looks elegant. But the Terminate Call key forces the phone to Terminate the application in use. All but the nimblest fingers would hit the key by accident. If you were writing a text, then, and made a tiny slip, you were catapulted back to the home screen, without warning, with the text or email message several clicks away in the Drafts folder. I use an E52 - and it's almost the perfect candybar business phone.

But because the flawed key design, with the floating backspace, is part of Nokia's 2010 "design language" for 2010, the flaw is replicated across several devices - including, now, the C3 and E5.

There are exceptions to the matrix. Nokia's N95-8GB is the best example of what Nokia can do when the gears mesh, and the organsation focuses on product quality - although it followed a painful time with its predecessor the N95, which took over six months to stabilise. The 8GB was brought to market quickly while it was still ahead of the competition, and saw improvements in almost every department; the phone's robust design gives users terrific service even today.

Maemo and the Nokia Internet Tablet devices were subversive projects that also managed to survive the infighting - and might possibly save the day. (And they must - as I wrote last week, there is no Plan C.)

The article also notes goodwill towards Nokia's new CEO, Stephen Elop, to restore Nokia's competitiveness. As he doubtless knows, a savage axe will accompany the restructuring. But as the Con-Lib Coalition is discovering, bureaucracies are much harder to dismantle than anyone realises, and you need a positive vision to go with the bloodshed. ®

Related Link

Helsingin Sanomat [in English]

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE accused of silencing customer gripes on social media pages
Hello. HELLO. Can EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE HEAR ME?!
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
Broadband slow and expensive? Blame Telstra says CloudFlare
Won't peer, will gouge for Internet transit
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?