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Fujitsu's NAS box for beginners

Celvin Q800 is the (small) business

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Fujitsu has updated its beginner's NAS (network-attached storage) box, making it run faster and store more data.

The Q800 is an update on the previous Q600 and Q700 models, which used a slow Marvell 6281 processor and had just one or two SATA disk drives. The product name, Celvin, refers to the Kelvin temperature scale. Fujitsu has a range of Celsius workstations, so it's clearly got a temperature bias in its branding department.

Anyway, the Q800 uses Intel's Atom D525 processor, making it ultra-fast compared to the previous models according to Fujitsu, and has four drive bays, with 4TB of usable capacity and RAID support. Fujitsu joins Acer, Cisco and HP in using the Atom chip for 4-bay NAS servers targeted at home users.

There are dual gigabit Ethernet ports plus USB 3.0 and eSATA connectivity. The operating system is stored in a read-only memory unit, called Disk on Memory, and there are two DoM units to protect against corruption.

There is an LCD controller screen on the small tower unit which includes a power button, display mode, copy and reset functions. As with the previous models, there is iTunes media server and DLNA support: Fujitsu has the home office in mind as well as very small businesses. Active Directory and iSCSI support is there as well. There is also a content management system with SQL support, called Joomla.

A second Q800 can be added to the initial box, taking capacity up to 8TB.

Fujitsu's idea is that this could be the first NAS product that small office/home office type businesses would buy. They can get their hands on it for €749 to €1,299, cheaper than a populated Drobo Pro, and it will ship next month. ®

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