Feeds

Flexi E Ink screen finds home in curved world time watch

Phosphor says 'no' to flat faces

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

E Ink isn't just for e-book readers, you know. Phosphor watches uses the low-power screen tech in its range of timepieces - which today got a new family member.

The World Time based around an "ultra-slim" - it's just 9.3mm thick - curved casing made possible by E Ink's Surf flexible display panel and which gives the watch a very high-contrast readout and a 180°-wide viewing angle.

Phosphor World Time Curved

As a chronometer, the World Time lets you display two times - home and away, for example - both taken from a selection of 24 timezones around the globe.

The twin-timezone display can also be set to simply show the time of day or both the date and time in either over-sized or conventional-size readouts.

The curved World Time is available with a choice of white or black plastic, black leather or stainless steep straps. Prices range from $150 to $195 (£94-122) in the US - the Phosphor Watches website has a list of UK retailers from whom you can order the watches. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?