Feeds

HTC design cleans Nokia's clock

And Apple's too

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Comment A stone's throw from El Reg's West End Office is Nokia's London design office. If the windows on Great Pulteney Street appear to be steamed up, here's a clue why.

Nokia owes much of its success to design, and employs some of the world's best designers. In the 1990s Nokia put design at the heart of its product development strategy. Nokia gave us small, slim pocketable phones, rather than something operated by Radar O'Reilly from M*A*S*H. It also made the external antenna disappear, and pioneered some erstwhile unthinkable ideas such as customisable covers. As an interface between man and phone, the Navikey UI has never been surpassed. It truly popularised the mobile phone.

If Nokia needs reminding that it has the fight of its life on its hands, then HTC's design efforts in cloud services and its Android UI are a pretty sharp warning. For years, HTC was a contract manufacturer for other people, and its baby steps at designing Windows mobile PDAs four years ago were competent but clunky. It has learned very fast, though, and I don't think anybody is going to be patronising HTC now.

Have a look at this infomercial for Sense - which outlines some of the UI ideas for both the handset, and the cloud service. I'm sorry we can't do much about the American voiceover.

A lot of these ideas are not eye-candy - they're actually quite useful.

Now I'll bet that very little you'll see here has not, at some point, been devised and demonstrated internally at Nokia's design studios. But it highlights the real problem of bureaucracy at the company: the problem is getting good design innovations out from the labs and into shipping products.

You don't need hundreds of designers to achieve that - Apple's team is famously small, and autonomous. They don't need to hail from 35 nationalities, as Nokia's Design team does. (Do the producers of Hollywood blockbusters need to translate dialogue into 35 vernaculars? Often, they don't really need to, and good design is a lingua franca).

But the impressive collection of ideas demonstrated by HTC isn't just an acute wake-up call for Nokia. There's a warning for Apple too - and the teaming Android licensees in whom so many of you have placed your confidence. For example, have a look at HTC's implementation of "Find my phone". It is far slicker than Apple's. And for Android licensees in the increasingly me-too world of Android, the message is: "This is what you have to compete with".

It's as well that Nokia isn't in the same boat. At last with Risku's "twin CEO" strategy - outlined here with one a hands-on product development and design guy - really isn't so daft. But it's unlikely to happen. So what can Nokia Design do?

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...
Guess they don't like our battery-draining update?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.