Feeds

India claims access to BlackBerry comms

Long way from resolution, with only weeks to go

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The Indian government is claiming that RIM has offered it access to instant messaging conversations within hours of a request, though access to email remains unresolved with time running out.

India told Reuters that RIM has offered to provide transcripts of instant messaging sessions, with real-time interception available by the end of the year. But RIM still has to sort out lawful intercept to BlackBerry email by the end of October or face a nationwide ban, while BlackBerry users in UAE are looking at a ban starting at the end of this week unless RIM manages the impossible, and quickly.

The UAE will instruct network operators to block BlackBerry communications, including web browsing, email and messaging, from next Monday (11 October) unless it gets lawful access to all communications before then. Apparently this is affecting sales of BlackBerrys in the region.

Messaging services are routed through RIM's servers, so can be intercepted, as can email services hosted by the company. But where a company has set up its own BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES) the encryption key is only shared between that server and the handset, so interception is all but impossible for RIM or anyone else.

Still, reality cuts little slack with politicians who are more concerned with listening in on criminals than understanding the intricacies of modern cryptography - as evidenced by the various calls insisting that RIM should be forced to hand over the mythical "master key" that would allow government's lawful intercept.

Last month RIM's CEO suggested that governments set up national registers and ask their citizens to submit encryption keys, pointing out that any government that wishes to eavesdrop on its citizens should make the request of those citizens, not an out-of-country supplier of IT kit.

It's a suggestion of which other governments might like to take note. The Obama administration is already making noises about requiring facilities for lawful intercept to be provided by every company involved in communications within the USA - but then it's much easier to bully IT companies than an entire electorate. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.