Feeds

India claims access to BlackBerry comms

Long way from resolution, with only weeks to go

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The Indian government is claiming that RIM has offered it access to instant messaging conversations within hours of a request, though access to email remains unresolved with time running out.

India told Reuters that RIM has offered to provide transcripts of instant messaging sessions, with real-time interception available by the end of the year. But RIM still has to sort out lawful intercept to BlackBerry email by the end of October or face a nationwide ban, while BlackBerry users in UAE are looking at a ban starting at the end of this week unless RIM manages the impossible, and quickly.

The UAE will instruct network operators to block BlackBerry communications, including web browsing, email and messaging, from next Monday (11 October) unless it gets lawful access to all communications before then. Apparently this is affecting sales of BlackBerrys in the region.

Messaging services are routed through RIM's servers, so can be intercepted, as can email services hosted by the company. But where a company has set up its own BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES) the encryption key is only shared between that server and the handset, so interception is all but impossible for RIM or anyone else.

Still, reality cuts little slack with politicians who are more concerned with listening in on criminals than understanding the intricacies of modern cryptography - as evidenced by the various calls insisting that RIM should be forced to hand over the mythical "master key" that would allow government's lawful intercept.

Last month RIM's CEO suggested that governments set up national registers and ask their citizens to submit encryption keys, pointing out that any government that wishes to eavesdrop on its citizens should make the request of those citizens, not an out-of-country supplier of IT kit.

It's a suggestion of which other governments might like to take note. The Obama administration is already making noises about requiring facilities for lawful intercept to be provided by every company involved in communications within the USA - but then it's much easier to bully IT companies than an entire electorate. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Mighty Blighty broadbanders beg: Let us lay cable in BT's, er, ducts
Complain to Ofcom that telco has 'effective monopoly'
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
BT said to have pulled patent-infringing boxes from DSL network
Take your license demand and stick it in your ASSIA
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Ofcom tackles complaint over Premier League footie TV rights
Virgin Media: UK fans pay the most for the fewest matches
prev story

Whitepapers

Go beyond APM with real-time IT operations analytics
How IT operations teams can harness the wealth of wire data already flowing through their environment for real-time operational intelligence.
The total economic impact of Druva inSync
Examining the ROI enterprises may realize by implementing inSync, as they look to improve backup and recovery of endpoint data in a cost-effective manner.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.