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Papers laud publication of DIY Dalek plans

Forget that fans have had 'em for years...

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The Daily Telegraph and others are making much of the online publication of a series of build-your-own Dalek blueprints from the 1970s.

The plans were apparently sent by the Doctor Who Production Office to a viewer. Reading today's stories, you'd think the blueprints had been missing, presumed lost, for years.

But, as any half-decent Who fan knows, the plans were published by the BBC in 1973 in a special edition of its listings magazine Radio Times to mark the tenth anniversary of the show.

Radio Times Doctor Who Special

Indeed, pics posted by the Telegraph suggest that the BBC simply sent out a set of photocopies of the pages in the special.

You can still pick original copies of the special for around £16 these days, rising to £100 if you want one signed by Dr Pertwee himself.

Even cheaper copies can be obtained if you settle for the reprint of the special put out by the BBC a few years ago.

Radio Times Doctor Who Special

Both can be had for nowt if you're willing to put up with a PDF of the scanned pages and do a little searching on the Internet for them. ®

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