Feeds

Microsoft caps Ballmer bonus over mobile phone, tablet failures

Kin hell means Stevie piggy bank still rattles

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Microsoft boss Steve Ballmer missed out on a maximum bonus in the company’s last fiscal year, after he failed to move quickly enough against Apple’s iPad and lost market share in the mobile phone biz.

The unsuccessful launch and speedy demise of Microsoft’s doomed social networking mobile device Kin also kept Ballmer’s piggy bank a little lighter than he might have hoped for in the year ended 30 June 2010.

Despite record sales the 54-year-old CEO only* picked up a cash bonus of $670,000, which was equal to his annual salary.

According to a US Securities and Exchange Commission proxy filing, that payout represented only half of the maximum bonus big Steve could have received if he had successfully pursued “innovations to take advantage of new form factors”. In other words, offer a sexy iPad tablet to the world.

Microsoft’s board of directors said Ballmer had done a good job with the launch of Windows 7, Office 2010, Bing and other products. They added that the chief’s “disciplined expense management” alongside the software releases had helped boost the firm’s coffers with revenues of $62.5bn for the year.

The board said that work was “well underway” in Microsoft’s move to the cloud with its Azure and Office Web Apps products, as well as with its active gaming (Kinect) wing of the business.

But none of that was enough to award Ballmer a maximum 200 per cent bonus for the year.

That said, Kin was a total dog’s dinner, which was killed by Microsoft after just three months due to pisspoor sales.

Furthermore, the company is yet to deepen its footprint in the smartphone market where it had lost share to Apple’s iPhone, RIM’s Blackberry and Google’s Android gadgets over the past few years.

MS will be shortly hoping to change that, with what looks likely to be the launch of Windows Phone 7 expected - though yet to be confirmed - in the next few weeks.

And then of course, there is the iPad. For all of Microsoft’s proclamations that it is “all-in” on the tablet, the vendor is in effect playing a desperate game of catchup with Apple. ®

*Yes, we know that is still an awfully good lump of cash.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.