Feeds

OCZ plays bottleneck card with new SSD interface

Enough with SATA and SAS already

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

Flash storage maker OCZ wants us to use its proprietary High Speed Data Link (HSDL) instead of standard SATA and SAS interfaces for solid state drives (SSDs).

HSDL was developed, OCZ says, to eliminate I/O bottlenecks and so enable SSDS to operate at their full potential. It can run at up to 20Gbit/s per channel, much faster than SATA II's 3Gbit/s and SATA III and SAS II's 6Gbit/s. Several HSDL channels can be combined to increase bandwidth further.

The drive interfaces to the HSDL link via a 4-lane PCIe SATA controller, which links with a SAS cable to PCIe at the host end where there is a multiplexer/demultiplexer, internal signal driver and buffering, available as a single chip if required. In effect we have a PCIe cable link direct to the drive.

OCZ's CEO, Ryan Petersen, said: "Storage protocols are quickly becoming the bottleneck to storage subsystem performance." The HSDL is: "designed for both high-performance computing and enterprise storage applications," and is "significantly outperforming other current interfaces delivering performance at levels that saturate most CPU busses."

The company claims HSDL is an open standard and is working with platform partners to spread its adoption.

OCZ is going to introduce a new 3.5-inch SSD called the IBIS which uses the HSDL interface. IBIS will ship with single port HSDL adapter cards, with quad port cards available for multiple drive configurations.

IBIS will use four SandForce SF-1200 controllers in the 3.5-inch device and these output 1GB/sec via 4 PCIe lanes over the HSDL cable to the motherboard and host PCIe bus.

The Skinflint comparison website mentions 240GB and 960GB IBIS products, using multi-level cell NAND, and with 750MB/sec read and write speeds.

OCZ apparently has a 4-port HSDL card with an on-board RAID controller in development. This could hook up four IBIS drives to a host via a PCIe x16 board.

There is no word on pricing. ®

Reducing security risks from open source software

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud
Just as Jeff Bezos did to books and CDs, Amazon's rivals are now doing to it
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
The triumph of VVOL: Everyone's jumping into bed with VMware
'Bandwagon'? Yes, we're on it and so what, say big dogs
Carbon tax repeal won't see data centre operators cut prices
Rackspace says electricity isn't a major cost, Equinix promises 'no levy'
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.