Feeds

UK cybercops cuff 19 ZeuS banking Trojan suspects

Gang blamed for £6m losses in three months

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Updated UK police have arrested 19 cybercrime suspects who allegedly used the ZeuS crimeware toolkit to capture online banking credentials before looting victims' bank accounts.

A total of 15 men and four women, aged between 23 and 47 years old, were arrested in dawn raids on in London Tuesday by officers from the newly established Police Central e-Crime Unit (PCeU), which is based in Scotland Yard. Investigators reckon the group is collectively responsible for the theft of £6m over the last three months from thousands of victims.

The suspects were arrested on suspicion of offences computer hacking and fraud offences and taken into custody for questioning. Two of those arrested will also be quizzed over the alleged possession of a firearm.

Police worked with the banking industry in the investigation that led up to Tuesday's arrests.

Detective Chief Inspector Terry Wilson of the PCeU, said: "We've worked closely with UK banks through our Virtual Taskforce approach to gather information and evidence which has resulted in today's arrests."

"We believe we have disrupted a highly organised criminal network, which has used sophisticated methods to siphon large amounts of cash from many innocent peoples' accounts, causing immense personal anxiety and significant financial harm."

"Online banking customers must make sure their security systems are up to date and be alert to any unusual or additional security features requested which is at variance with their normal log-on experience. Greater public awareness and education will make it harder for personal details to be compromised and for this type of fraud to be carried out," he added.

The arrests follow reports from security firms including Trusteer and M86 Security of a series of targeted attacks at UK bank accounts using the ZeuS crimeware toolkit. ZeuS is most often used as a banking Trojan but it also lends itself to spam distribution or denial of service attacks. Customised copies of the malware are traded on underground carding forums, an business that's highly unlikely to suffer any disruption from this week's arrests.

PCeU officers separately arrested two suspected ZeuS-using cybercrooks in Manchester last November. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.