Feeds

YouTube accounts for 13 percent of mobile data

Mobile TV seems to have happened

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

Video streaming now makes up 35 per cent of data carried over the mobile networks, with YouTube supplying 40 per cent of that, so the airwaves are filled with TV all over again.

The figures come from the Allot MobileTrends report for the fist half of 2010, based on data passing through operators around the world with a total of 190m subscribers. That data shows video streaming in the first half of 2010 was almost double the previous six months, and is now the largest consumer of mobile bandwidth as everyone seems to be watching TV on the move:

Breakdown of mobile data consumption

YouTube counts for 40 per cent of the video, so what are the rest watching?

VoIP has also increased hugely since 2009, rising more than 80 per cent which should concern mobile operators despite the fact that VoIP is still a small proportion of the total. Mobile VoIP is dominated by Skype, whose traffic makes up 83 per cent of voice total.

Also on the rise is Facebook, traffic to which is three times what it was in 2009, and Twitter, which is up by more than four times. Allot puts that down to increased availability of specialist applications, but notes that (according to Facebook) mobile users are "twice as active" as their desk-chained contemporaries.

All of which leads to a 68 per cent increase in the consumption of mobile data around the world, which is nice for mobile consumers but one has to ask who is making money from all that mobility?

Operators aren't - customers making voice calls subsidise data users, who are still a loss leader in most countries. Mobile Facebook and YouTube aren't delivering adverts so there's no revenue there. Twitter's ability to make money on any platform is still very suspect, which leaves Skype as the only company delivering a mobile service and seemingly making money from it.

So while the rate of data consumption continues to rise we should enjoy this nirvana of free and cheap mobile services - it's not going to last forever. ®

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.