Feeds

CA Tech snaps up Hyperformix

Hyperventilating for cloudy control

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Tuesday, CA Technologies snapped up Hyperformix, a server virtualization capacity management tool maker based in Austin, Texas.

Maybe the former Computer Associates should have changed its name to Cloudy Automation instead of CA Technologies when it rebranded itself a few months back.

CA Tech has been on the prowl to build out its system management and securities toolset with products that help it reach out and control today's cloudy infrastructure, much as its system management frameworks and the tools that hooked into it assumed control of physical IT assets and their rigid software stacks. Tuesday's acquisition, the terms of which were not announced, upgraded their efforts from prowl to pounce.

Hyperformix was founded in 2000, an offshoot of another software company called Scientific Engineering Software that created predictive-modeling software aimed at engineering projects. As the dot-com boom took off, the company took its modeling engine and applied it to system and network operations, creating the Hyperformix capacity management tools.

Hyperformix's basic premise — that companies need predictive IT management tools, not just ones that let system administrators react to changes in workloads after they have already impacted performance — is perhaps more valid in a virtual server age when virtual servers and virtual switches are flitting around the network like busy bees.

According to a report by the Austin Business Journal, Hyperformix had around 70 employees last March — there are 50 at the moment, according to Subo Guha, vice president of product management for virtualization products at CA Tech.

The company closed a $3.8m round of equity and debt funding last March, with Leasing Technologies International, M/C Venture Partners, and Morgan Stanley Venture Partners kicking in the dough. The company had a $12m round of funding in 2002, and its $8m Series C funding round in 2006. Total funding figures were not available at press time.

CA Tech says it expects to close the Hyperformix acquisition by December 31. Hyperformix's Capacity Manager, Data Manager, and Performance Optimizer tools will be added to CA Tech's Virtualization and Automation business unit and will tuck up into its CA Virtual product line, adding predictive capacity management to provisioning and monitoring tools.

Guha says that Hyperfomix had more than 200 customers and was among the top-tier players in the still-nascent virtualization capacity management space. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
IT crisis looming: 'What if AWS goes pop, runs out of cash?'
Public IaaS... something's gotta give - and it may be AWS
Linux? Bah! Red Hat has its eye on the CLOUD – and it wants to own it
CEO says it will be 'undisputed leader' in enterprise cloud tech
BT claims almost-gigabit connections over COPPER WIRE
Just need to bring the fibre box within 19m ...
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.