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Channel islanders attack Street View car

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Two of Google's Street View cars have been vandalised on the Channel Island of Guernsey.

The camera-cars were on their second visit to the island. They were originally due in May but were delayed by the discovery that the cars were slurping up data from unsecured Wi-Fi networks, the BBC reports.

The cars had their tyres slashed and cables cut, according to Channelonline.

Google said it was taking the incident extremely seriously and working with the police to find the culprits. It said the cars had taken most of the images needed already, but would return if necessary.

Showing a lack of irony and a touching concern for the privacy of their vehicles that they rarely show the rest of us, Google asked Channel Television not to film the damaged cars.

We assume the ad giant will need to dust off the Street View snoop-trike in order to fully document the nearby island of Sark, which does not allow cars. ®

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