Feeds

DWP's Harley tops government CIO pay list

9 gov IT managers paid more than PM

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Nine government IT managers earn more than the prime minister, according to information released by the BBC.

Joe Harley, IT director general and chief information officer (CIO) for the Department for Work and Pensions, and John Suffolk, Cabinet Office CIO, have average salaries of £262,500 and £207,499 respectively.

They are the highest earning senior IT professionals in the public sector, according to the data released by the BBC's Panorama programme and compiled by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism based on some 2,400 Freedom of Information responses. Kable searched the data for job titles of senior IT managers.

David Cameron cut five per cent from the prime minister's salary when he took office in May, reducing it to £142,500. The coalition government has made the figure a benchmark for high pay. But out of 20 senior public sector IT professionals in the data, nine earn more than the prime minister, while two more are on the same salary.

The third highest earner after Harley and Suffolk is Christine Connelly, chief information officer at the Department of Health, whose average pay was £202,499 in 2009-10. She is followed by Andy Nelson and Phil Pavitt, who hold the same posts at the Ministry of Justice and HM Revenue and Customs. Nelson earns £192,499 whilst Pavitt is on an average salary of £182,499.

The highest-paid local authority IT professional in the data was David Cockburn, executive director of strategy, economic development and ICT at Kent County Council, while the best-paid IT manager for an NHS organisation was Kevin Jarrold, CIO of NHS London.

Francis Maude, the Cabinet Office minister responsible for reducing the public sector pay bill, told the BBC he questioned the rising salaries in the wider public sector and the idea that they were necessary to attract qualified people.

This article was originally published at Kable.

Kable's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?
Can you hear the difference? Can anyone?
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.