Feeds

Facebook OKed by Canada privacy czar (for now)

Canuck eyes Zuck

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Facebook has resolved the data-sharing issues that lead to an investigation by Canada's privacy commissioner, according to the commissioner herself. But she says her work with Facebook isn't over.

"While we are satisfied that the changes address the concerns raised during our investigation, there is still room for improvement in some areas," reads a statement from Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart. "We’ve asked Facebook to continue to improve its oversight of application developers and to better educate them about their privacy responsibilities."

Among other things, the commission was concerned that third-party developers on the social networking site had "virtually unrestricted access" to the personal information of the site's users, but Stoddart says that Facebook has successfully addressed this issue. "Facebook has since rolled out a permissions model that is a vast improvement," she says. "Applications must now inform users of the categories of data they require to run and seek consent to access and use this data. Technical controls ensure that applications can only access user information that they specifically request."

Stoddart is also pleased that Facebook has simplified its privacy settings and allowed users to apply separate settings to each photo or comment they post. "It has been a long road in arriving at this point. These changes are the result of extensive and often intense discussions with Facebook. Our follow-up work was complicated by the fact that we were dealing with a site that was continually changing.," she says.

"Overall, Facebook has implemented the changes it promised following our investigation."

But the commission will continue to keep a close eye on the ever-changing site. "Facebook is constantly evolving and we are actively following the changes there – as well as on other social networking sites. We will take action if we feel there are potential new violations of Canadian privacy law," Stoddart says. "As well, we have received several further complaints about issues that were not part of our first investigation and we are now examining those."

This includes a complaint over Facebook’s invitation feature and the Facebook “Like” buttons on third-party sites. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Big Content outs piracy hotbeds: São Paulo, Beijing ... TORONTO?
MPAA calls Canadians a bunch of bootlegging movie thieves
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
Hungary's internet tax cannot be allowed to set a precedent, says EC
More protests planned against giga-tariff for Tuesday evening
US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'
Netizens allegedly duped into paying for bogus tech advice
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.