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Steve Jobs chops student hack down to size

'Leave us alone' - sent from my iPhone

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Steve Jobs may not be a ninja, but when an over-enthusiastic journalism student had the temerity to email him to complain about Apple's less than helpful press office last week, he quickly chopped her down to size.

The Guardian splendidly reports that Chelsea Isaacs, a journalism student at Long Island University was tasked with writing a piece about an iPad program at the campus.

Being young and eager and conscientious she thought she would check in with the firm's press department. She got no reply to her message, nor to the five subsequent messages she sent - even though she said she was on a deadline.

At a loss for what to do she found Jobs' email on the web and asked if he could help out, as the story was "vital to my academic grade as a journalist".

As well as referring to the hypocrisy of "ignoring student needs when they represent a company that does so much for our schools, the Media Relations reps are apparently, also failing to responsibly handle the inquiries of professional journalists on deadlines." This she suggested could cost professional journalists their jobs. Well, not at the Reg. Or it transpires, The Guardian.

Within an hour, Chelsea had her answer from the man himself: "Our goals do not include helping you get a good grade. Sorry."

Oh, that was sent from "my iPhone".

Chelsea replied once again mentioning her grade, and foolishly, castigating Jobs over a "lack of common courtesy". She clearly didn't realise that a sorry from Apple is about as good as it gets.

Jobs - or his phone ghost - replied that he was only interested in helping people who have a problem.

To which Chelsea replied that she did have a problem, and could he get the PRs to reply. Cos she's on a deadline.

Jobs then administered the coup de grace:

"Please leave us alone."

The Guardian adds that it too has had no reply from Apple when raising Chelsea's case, adding that her experience is hardly unique. Too true - we're still waiting for the definitive answer on whether Jobs is indeed a ninja.

Still, should Ms Isaacs be found incapacitated with her college project and a copy of The Guardian pinned to her chest with a throwing death star, we feel we'll at least have an indirect answer to our most recent questions. ®

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