Feeds

A quarter of Americans using mobile apps

But 35 per cent have them

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The Pew Internet & American Live Project has been examining mobile apps, revealing the shocking news that rich people buy more applications, while the elderly poor buy fewer.

To be fair to Pew, which interviewed almost two thousand Americans for the study, the report does have some insight into how and when Americans download applications, though the vast majority of the data simply confirms what common sense would otherwise tell us.

Apparently, young, rich and well educated chaps download the most applications, which is hardly stunning news. The average number of applications downloaded (18) is skewed by a small number of people downloading huge numbers of apps (the mean is 10), which is equally unedifying.

More interesting is the fact that 11 per cent of those questioned had no idea if they had "apps" on their phones at all. Pew's definition includes applications pre-installed on the handset, but some users obviously don't include those, as the report points out - 34 per cent of mobile phone users admit to playing games on their handsets, but only 29 per cent of the same group said they used mobile "apps".

Chart showing US mobile application usage

Figures for all Americans, based on asking two thousand of them

When it comes to downloading applications, 29 per cent of those with a mobile phone had done so, though less than half that number (13 per cent) had paid for the privilege. The latest research didn't look at how those users chose their applications, but the report does present findings from a larger, self-selected study which found that application stores are still the primary source of recommendations (49 per cent).

Next up were friends' recommendations (43 per cent), followed by web sites (18 per cent), with the network operator's home pages only just behind (17 per cent). Eight per cent of applications were found from within other applications, which makes sense given that the majority of embedded advertising seems to be for other applications these days.

A much more detailed breakdown by age, sex, ethnicity and so forth is available in the full report. It's worth a look if you're launching a mobile application, or just like having your preconceptions confirmed. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Brits: Google, can you scrape 60k pages from web, pleeease
Hey, c'mon Choc Factory, it's our 'right to be forgotten'
Of COURSE Stephen Elop's to blame for Nokia woes, says author
'Google did have some unique propositions for Nokia'
FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
It's even GRIMMER up North after MEGA SKY BROADBAND OUTAGE
By 'eck! Eccles cake production thrown into jeopardy
Mobile coverage on trains really is pants
You thought it was just *insert your provider here*, but now we have numbers
Don't mess with Texas ('cos it's getting Google Fiber and you're not)
A bit late, but company says 1Gbps Austin network almost ready to compete with AT&T
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.