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Nikon points D7000 camera at high-end enthusiasts

More focus, less noise

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Nikon hauled in London's camera and tech press corps yesterday to show off its latest DSLR, the Nikon D7000. We shall post a review soon enough, but for now, here's a run down of the spec.

Positioned between the Nikon D90 and the D300s, this 16.2mp camera is aimed at enthusiasts who are willing to pay £1100 for a body only or £1299 with a 18-105mm VR lenses.

Nikon D7000 DSLR camera from the top

Take it from the top

They get lots of spec for their bucks, housed in a sealed, magnesium alloy "highly durable" compact body.

The D7000 uses a new CMOS image sensor, EXPEED 2, Nikon's new image processing engine, to deliver better image quality with less noise than its downmarket D90 sister.

There's a new colour metering systems and a new 39 point AF system to help keep everything in sharp focus.

As you would expect the D7000 captures video in full HD (1080p) mode - and it has two SD memory slots for storage.

More at Nikon.

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