Feeds

Nokia's No.2 bails out

It's nothing personal

The essential guide to IT transformation

Anssi Vanjoki, widely seen as the No.2 at Nokia, has announced he will leave the company.

It means Nokia will be looking for a new head of its mobile phone division for the third time in a year. Vanjoki has led the division - which contributes most of Nokia's revenue and almost all of its profits - for just two months.

Nokia announced its first ever non-Finn CEO on Friday, hiring Canadian Stephen Elop from Microsoft to replace Olli-Pekka Kallasvuo. The timing is abrupt, with the annual Nokia World event scheduled to start tomorrow.

Vanjoki heads the Mobile Solutions unit and has served on the group executive board for several years. Recent years have seen him billed as the second keynote speaker, indicating his seniority and influence at the company.

He was thought to be the leading internal candidate to replace Kalasvuo. Vanjoki said he will serve out six months notice.

Click to enlarge

Vanjoki joined Nokia in 1991 from 3M, and rose through the sales division. He ran the Multimedia unit from 2004 to 2008, where he oversaw the launch of the N-Series range and branded Nokia's smartphones as "multimedia computers" - a comparison that didn't really flatter the company after the launch of the iPhone. The unit was effectively dissolved in OPK's first reshuffle in 2007, to end the pointless rivalry between the E-Series and N-Series teams.

He took the reins of the mobile phone division - which contributes most of Nokia's revenue and almost all of its profits - following a reshuffle in April. His predecessor, former CFO Rick Simonson, had only been in the post six months.

In July Vanjoki promised a "fightback", and has been found burning the midnight oil by posting comments on obscure and unread weblogs.

Earlier this year he gave a frank assessment of the failure of the N97. Yet as he introduced the equally awful N97 Mini last year, he showed his ability to speak fluent Segmentese, the language that Nokians use to create and convey "understandable marketable entities" (in his words).

As he told Nokia World 2009, the key to the market were "style leaders" and "technology stylers" - "image seekers" and "young explorers" at the "aspirational" rather than "rational" end of the axis. Millions are spent on this sort of thing.

His frankness could also get him into trouble. At a press conference in 2007, responding to why a Nokia device looked like an iPhone, Vanjoki replied that "if there is something good in the world, we copy with pride". Apple has used the quotation several times in its counter-lawsuit against Nokia. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
EE plonks 4G in UK Prime Minister's backyard
OK, his constituency. Brace yourself for EXTRA #selfies
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.