Feeds

Consultants bag £37m from failed e-Borders contract

Project reopening to tender

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

The Home Office paid more than £37m to just one consultancy for advice on the e-Borders contract, which was torn up by the coalition after the election.

The advisory payments to Deloitte compare to the £750m cost of the floundering project to record details of every traveller into and out of the UK.

Trusted Borders, the Raytheon-led consortium of technology companies appointed by Labour to implement the system, was sacked by Theresa May in July over previously undisclosed delays of more than 12 months.

Deloitte began advising the government on e-Borders in September 2005, and played a key role in the design of the complex contract with Trusted Borders. By mid-2008 taxpayers had paid £23.8m for the consultancy

Today only two consultants from the firm remain on the programme, tidying up the failed contract with Trusted Borders.

The Home Office today reaffirmed it is committed to the e-Borders programme, and said the massive contract will be reopened to tender. During the original bidding process, Trusted Borders' only rival was a consortium led by BT.

"The new government is determined to make sure that we control our borders but schemes like e-Borders have to represent value for money for the taxpayer," a Home office spokesman said.

Deloitte apparently remains proud of its role in the failed contract. A case study (pdf) on its website boasts: "Throughout the engagement Deloitte ... enabled the programme to develop an integrated, multi-disciplinary team who were highly motivated, professional and delivery-focused."

The amount paid out to KPMG, which also consulted on e-Borders, isn't yet known. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Putin: Crack Tor for me and I'll make you a MILLIONAIRE
Russian Interior Ministry offers big pile o' roubles for busting pro-privacy browser
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
UK.gov's Open Source switch WON'T get rid of Microsoft, y'know
What do you mean, we've ditched Redmond in favour of IBM?!
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.