Feeds

Unity – iPhone code swap approved by Jobs (for now)

Un-Flash eyes world of Google

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Unity is not Adobe

This does separate Unity from the Adobe iPhone Packager, which bypasses Apple's XCode entirely. "The Packager," Adobe once told us, "allows a Flash developer to compile the ActionScript code down to native iPhone/iPad machine code, in the form of an .ipa file, which is the file that you submit to Apple for approval & inclusion on the App Store." If Jobs is worried that third-party dev platforms won't adopt his APIs as fast as he would like, Unity would seem to offer a means of alleviating that fear.

"The key thing for Apple is they want high-quality content that takes advantage of their features," says Unity chief creative officer Nicholas Francis, another company co-founder. "It's very important to them that developers have access to [their latest APIs]...if you want to use the latest APIs, we make that simple to do."

What's more, the Unity platform benefits from the simple fact that it's not Adobe Flash. Judging from Steve Jobs open letter on Flash, it would seem that his SDK change was an effort to ban Adobe in particular. The letter lists a multitude of Adobe sins, the release of the iPhone Packager being just one.

But Apple has yet to grant Unity its official approval, and one has to wonder if the ban could occur at any time. "It has certainly introduced some FUD, and that's annoying," Helgason says. "But Unity games are selling in the App Store...and I think that Apple is being honest when they say 'We're still thinking.'"

"I think that Apple is being honest when they say 'We're still thinking.'" – Unity

If the ban does come down, Unity has a plan B, which would mean switching all development to C++ — i.e., no .NET code whatsoever. "We haven't committed to actually doing this," he said, "but we will if we have to. We're not going to leave our customers behind."

Whatever Apple decides, Unity is more than just an iPhone development platform. It was originally created to build applications for mass market desktops and the web. And it builds for gaming consoles such as the Nintendo Wii, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360. Outfits such as BigPoint are using the platform to build browser-based massively multiplayer online games, and game giant Electronic Arts built its web title Tiger Woods Online with Unity.

What's more, the company is on the verge of officially releasing a version for Google Android. Unity for Android is currently in beta, and one title built with the platform has already turned up in the Android Marketplace.

Meanwhile, Google has tapped Helgason and company to help bootstrap that new-age web platform known as Native Client, the Chrome and Chrome OS technology that runs native code inside the browser. At its annual developer conference this May, Mountain View told the world that Unity had developed a version of its game-playing browser plug-in based on Native Client, and it has already demoed a Native Client title from another high-profile customer, LEGO.

Say what you will about Google. It isn't likely to blacklist applications simply because they were written with tools it doesn't approve of. ®

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
KDE releases ice-cream coloured Plasma 5 just in time for summer
Melty but refreshing - popular rival to Mint's Cinnamon's still a work in progress
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.