Feeds

New iPod crew: 'Phoney, futuristic, retro, doomed'

Apple admits error shock

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

iPod nano

The iPod nano received the most radical makeover Wednesday, being transformed from a movie-taking handheld in a traditional click-wheel-and-screen colorful-rectangle form factor, into a camera-less clip-on with an FM tuner and multi-touch controls in a colorful square.

iPod nano

Good-bye video camera, hello FM radio and miniscule multi-touch display

The design overhaul is "the biggest reinvention of the iPod nano since its debut in 2005," Jobs said in a statement accompanying the little fellow's debut — and for once he wasn't exaggerating.

The clickwheel that had graced the iPod nano's face since its introduction is gone, replaced by a 1.54-inch, 220ppi, 240x240-pixel TFT display — not unlike the one the The Reg showed you in July thanks to a tip from some far-east fanbois — whose website no longer has the offending image but instead the sad commentary: "Because under some pressure, this content will be deleted. Please be aware and understanding."

The clip-equipped music player is small, indeed — 37.5-by-40.9-by-8.8 millimeters — and weighs just over 21 grams. Navigation and controls are accessed by tapping and swiping the display, and control icons can be moved among what appear to be (Apple doesn't say, specifically) four home screens.

The midget musician includes an accelerometer to keep the display correctly oriented, and also a pedometer to support the built-in Nike + iPod runner's link-up that Apple has been pushing for years, but which has never really lit up the fanbois firmament.

The new iPod nano will be available next week in silver, graphite, blue, green, orange, and pink anodized aluminum at $149 for 8GB and $179 for 16GB.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Next page: iPod shuffle

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.