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Microsoft locks down Windows Phone 7 code

10 million hours of test

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Windows Phone 7 is finally finished.

On Wednesday, Microsoft said that code for Windows Phone 7 has been released to manufacturing, meaning OEMs who made Microsoft's tight cut as phone suppliers can start installing version 1.0 of Microsoft's smartphone operating system on devices.

Vice president of Windows Phone engineering Terry Myerson blogged that Windows Phone 7 has been tested on nearly 10,000 devices per day and subjected to nearly 10 million hours of tests.

"We are ready," Myerson wrote.

Since the latest Windows Phone 7 code drop, July's technical preview, Microsoft's added the ability for users to filter their contacts so only Facebook friends "they really know" will show up. Also, you can quickly post a message to somebody's Facebook page, Myerson wrote.

Phones running Windows Phone 7 are due to be released with the operating system's official launch in October for Europe and November for the US, according to Microsoft watcher Mary-Jo Foley. ®

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