Feeds

VMware app dev platform gazes beyond SpringSource Java

Eyes Ruby, PHP, .NET

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

VMworld VMware says that its Cloud Application Platform – a means of building and deploying applications that has grown up around the SpringSource Java framework – will eventually embrace other programming languages, including Ruby-on-Rails, PHP, and perhaps .NET.

"Initially, we want to target the 2.5-million-strong Spring Java community," Shaun Connolly, VMware vice president of SpringSource product management, said today during a press briefing at the company's annual VMworld trade show in San Francisco, California. "But we want to set the foundation for laying in other languages such as Ruby on Rails and PHP, which are two of the more popular." He also acknowledged that .NET is a possibility.

Rod Johnson, the former SpringSource man who now serves as senior vice president of VMware's application platform division, indicated that in adding Ruby and PHP love, VMware will not acquire relevant dev tool outfits in the way it acquired SpringSource last year.

"Our goal is to provide a really good experience for developers and there are various of ways of doing that," he said. "We have a pretty broad set of technology expertise within VMware so we don't necessarily need to acquire to embrace other developer communities.

"The SpringSource acquisition was a relatively large acquisition that provided an anchor point and an understanding of how to and an ability to address developer communities. We have that DNA inside of the company now, and we've brought in a number of experts in other developer-facing technologies. So there are a number of options on how to move forward."

Pressed, the company indicated that it will somehow embrace open source Ruby and PHP tools. "A lot of these tools are open source, so they are publicly available," VMware senior director of cloud and application services Gerald Chen told The Reg. "At the end of the day, we will address each language individually."

Following the acquisition of SpringSource last year, VMware also snapped up several outfits that now provide a set of application services that the company calls vFabric. These include RabbitMQ, an open source messaging platform for use with so-called cloud-based applications, and GemFire, a distributed data management platform.

The idea is that by bringing all these technologies together, VMware will help developers build applications atop both public "infrastructure clouds" and the private variety. VMware's just-released vCloud Director platform underpins Amazon EC2-like public clouds from VMware partners such as Verizon, but it's also a means of building similar services inside private data centers. Both provide access to scalable computing resources, including processing power, storage, and networking.

Whether you're running on a public cloud or a private cloud or both, the thinking goes, SpringSource and vFabric will facilitate the development of applications suited to such virtualized infrastructures. And, VMware says, these virtualized infrastructures needn't be based on vCloud. The company is also partnering with the likes to Salesforce.com and Google to bring SpringSource and vFabric to third-party public clouds.

VMware is currently working to build a kind of public Spring-based cloud on top of Salesforce.com's Force.com service. This vmForce service is, in the parlance of the day, a development cloud or platform cloud. It's a means of building applications that run on remote infrastructure. Meanwhile, VMware has partnered with Google to let Spring coders build apps for Mountain View's development cloud, Google App Engine.

A source close to VMware tells The Reg that the company is developing its own public development cloud that includes Spring's Java tools as well as tools for other languages, but Johnson and Connolly denied this was the case. The company indicated that it will continue to work with partner online services who offer such services.

"We are going to market through working with partners, and that is the path we're currently going down," said Johnson. Asked if that meant the company would not offer is own development cloud, Chen – after some silence from Connolly and Johnson – said: "That's right."

It would seem that VMware intends to offer Ruby and PHP through Salesforce and Google – or through similar partnerships – though it should be noted that at the moment, Google App Engine only plays with Java and Python.

The company also indicated that it will offer Ruby and PHP tools for building application atop private clouds, but the details are unclear. "Different developer communities have different standards, if you will, for tools they like to develop in," Chen said. "We will [serve developers] through a combination of offering tools and partnering with companies who know these communities as well." ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.