Feeds

Google butterfingers slip jazz hands bug into Gmail

Party like it's 1929 (whether you want to or not)

Security for virtualized datacentres

An extremely annoying bug that plays an old ragtime tune has commandeered Google’s Gmail, after the company debuted its ‘Priority Inbox’ feature earlier this week.

Gmail users, some of whom were spooked by the glitch, bombarded the company’s email forum last night.

“Whenever I sign into my Gmail using Chrome, music automatically starts playing. This is a new issue. It's like old time dance music,” wrote barnolde on the forum.

“Occasionally there will be a sound effect like a click, a bubble, cards shuffling, a dog growling. There is no music running on my computer.”

However – embarrassingly for Mountain View – the bug is only found when a Gmail account is viewed via Google’s Chrome. It doesn’t show up in Firefox or other browsers.

“This exact same thing is happening to me. It was really freaking me out for a bit. I kept thinking, ‘This is seriously how horror movies start... soon a giant clown will pop out of my closet with an axe in hand and spray me with his fake boutonniere.’ :),” wrote OlswangerB.

“It is still happening, even though I clicked on that link and paused the video. I even closed out of chrome and restarted it and it is still happening.”

Google said it was aware of the bug and added that its team was working on a fix.

The tune itself is only supposed to play if a user clicks on a link connected to an embedded YouTube vid that demonstrates the new feature.

The Priority Inbox tool hasn’t been rolled out to all Gmail users yet. So not everyone who uses the popular webmail service in Chrome will have to put up with a 1920s jazz din nosily invading his or her computers.

For those less fortunate people whose Gmail is already riddled with the bug, which replays every time a new Gmail page is loaded, the best advice – as Gawker astutely pointed out – is to “use less Google”.

Now show us your jazz hands, dears. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft to bake Skype into IE, without plugins
Redmond thinks the Object Real-Time Communications API for WebRTC is ready to roll
Mozilla: Spidermonkey ATE Apple's JavaScriptCore, THRASHED Google V8
Moz man claims the win on rivals' own benchmarks
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
Oi, Windows, centOS and openSUSE – behave, we're all friends here
Apple's OS X Yosemite slurps UNSAVED docs into iCloud
Docs, email contacts... shhhlooop, up it goes
Was ist das? Eine neue Suse Linux Enterprise? Ausgezeichnet!
Version 12 first major-number Suse release since 2009
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
How to simplify SSL certificate management
Simple steps to take control of SSL certificates across the enterprise, and recommendations centralizing certificate management throughout their lifecycle.