Feeds

VMware floats into developer cloud services

Three-way fluffing promised

Intelligent flash storage arrays

VMworld VMware is floating a Microsoft Azure-like developer cloud for coders building apps on SpringSource's middleware, but the news is carefully wrapped in a fluffy statement on "branding".

Today, at VMworld, in San Francisco, California, the company will announce something called vFabric. vFabric consists of integrated versions of the existing Tomcat-base tcServer, GemFire management systems, RabbitMQ messaging, ERS dynamic load balancing, and Hyperic application performance management.

John Gilmartin, VMware director of product marketing for private cloud products, told The Reg that vFabric is a "rebranding" but said this would include no new products.

The components in VMware's SpringSource stable were already integrated, and a source close to the company has told The Reg that VMware intends to offer its own public online service based on the SpringSource middleware that comprises vForce. This developer cloud is also believed to be headed in the direction of running multiple languages, not just Java - the heritage of the open-source Spring.

"This is substantially more than marketing bundles," the source told us.

It's not clear when VMware's cloud will be floated or what pricing will be.

VMware's own, public cloud would be the logical third leg in an unfolding strategy offering VMware products for people to build their own clouds and also working with other industry platform and application providers to deliver clouds based on vSphere and SpringSource.

Today, at VMworld, VMware will announce vCloud Director to create "virtual data centers" - pools of processing power, storage, and networking with the complexity abstracted. The idea is customers of service providers can set up clouds without needing to become tangled in complicated the usual systems administration work and provisioning of assets.

Also coming today are VMware vShield, VMware vShield App, and vShield Endpoint for virtual firewalls, VPNs, and load balancing.

Away from products, VMware has been working with Salesforce.com on VMforce to host Java applications on its proprietary Force.com platform using Spring and vSphere. Earlier this year, Google and VMware announced support for Spring Java apps on Google App Engine and Spring Roo with Google Web Toolkit. Also announced was work to integrate Spring Insight performance tracing used in tcServer with Google's Speed Tracer technology to monitor performance of applications built using Spring and Google Web Toolkit.

By building its own developer cloud, in addition to partnering with existing cloud providers and offering tools and services for customers to float their own clouds, VMware's covering its bases.

VMware was unwilling to comment about its plans ahead of Tuesday's official VMworld news. In a statement, though, VMware confirmed it wants to serve cloud in three ways.

"Our strategy is to ensure portability of applications across private and public clouds built on VMware and bring Java to cloud computing in an open and portable way. VMforce and our collaboration with Google are great examples of VMware frameworks and platform services working within two cloud models successfully," the company said. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Entity Framework goes 'code first' as Microsoft pulls visual design tool
Visual Studio database diagramming's out the window
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.