Feeds

Lady vicar tells Anglicans to learn from Black Sabbath

Jesus is metal

Security for virtualized datacentres

A Church of England vicar has told the Anglican community that it could do worse than learning to relax and taking a few cues from heavy metal.

The Reverend Rachel Mann writes in the Church Times that the outpourings of Black Sabbath and their musical descendants demonstrated a "liberative theology of darkness" enabling acolytes to be "relaxed and fun".

This is in contrast to your average Anglicans, the Daily Telegraph quotes her as saying, who are over sincere and take themselves too seriously.

Mann goes on to prove exactly what she means by managing to sound over sincere and too serious: “As both priest and metal musician and fan, it strikes me that the Church, especially at this agonized time, has a serious gospel lesson to learn from this darkest and heaviest music.”

Still, she makes a game effort to convince those who look to Canterbury rather than Donnington for guidance, extolling metal's intense beats, muscular vocals and unflinching engagement with death, violence and destruction.

“The music’s willingness to deal with nihilistic and, on occasion, extremely unpleasant subjects seems to offer its fans a space to accept others in a way that shames many Christians," she says.

She adds that parish councils across the land may want to emulate the ways of the headbanger, who she describes as generally “graceful, welcoming and gentle”.

Sadly while Mann talks addresses the music and the fans, she doesn't elaborate on what Christians can learn from heavy metal's own practitioners.

It would interesting how some of the more extreme exploits of metallers over the years can be shoehorned into Anglican theology.

Certainly Ozzy Osbourne has been hovering between life and eternal damnation for years, in some kind of Hollywood-style purgatory. Similarly, AC/DC's Angus Young reminds us of St Paul's injunction to put away childish things.

However, we think it would be beyond the powers of Mann to put a biblical twist on Led Zeppelin's infamous red snapper episode. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Are you a fat boy? Get to university NOW, you PENNILESS SLACKER
Rotund types paid nearly 20% less than people who didn't eat all the pies
Emma Watson should SHUT UP, all this abuse is HER OWN FAULT
... said an anon coward who we really wish hadn't posted on our website
Japan develops robot CHEERLEADERS which RIDE on BALLS
'Will put smiles on faces worldwide', predicts corporate PR chief
Bruges Booze tubes to pump LOVELY BEER underneath city
Belgian booze pumped from underground
Let it go, Steve: Ballmer bans iPads from his LA Clippers b-ball team
Can you imagine the scene? 'Hey guys, it's your new owner – WTF is that on your desk?'
Amazon: Wish in one hand, Twit in the other – see which one fills first
#AmazonWishList A year's supply of Arran scotch, ta
SLOSH! Cops dethrone suspect - by tipping over portaloo with him inside
Talk about raising a stink and soiling your career
Ingredient found in TASTY BEER is GOOD for your BRAIN
You only have to drink 2k litres a day to see the effect...
Oz carrier Tiger Air takes terror alerts to new heights
Don't doodle, it might cost you your flight
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.