Feeds

Disruptive JBoss duo fluff Java cloud

IBM and Oracle take note

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

Two of the brains behind the disruptive open source application server JBoss are building platform services for Java coders.

JBoss' ex-chief technology officer Sacha Labourey is leading CloudBees, a company that plans to deliver Java development tools as a set of hosted services charged by the minute. JBoss' former vice president of strategy Bob Bickel is also on board as an adviser.

CloudBee's first offering is Hudson as a Service (HaaS), based on the Hudson open source continuous-integration project, and released as a beta.

The idea echoes Salesforce.com's original CRM offering for suits, of giving you the important data and tools without needing to install the software.

Hudson lets you set up and monitor code changes in version-control systems such as svn and git so you can build Java applications using tools such as Ant and Maven, and then conduct tests.

Bickel said in a blog post announcing HaaS that Hudson is perfect as a cloud service because:

It is kind of hard to set up (the CloudBees HaaS makes it easy), it is bursty (so CloudBees charging by the minute makes a lot of economic sense), development and release teams never have enough machine resources for all the processes Hudson needs to spawn (no problem with a cloud of worker-bee Hudson Slaves dynamically scaling up and down to handle any load), and it works best when it delivers on the promise of CONTINUOUS Integration (CloudBees is ready when you are).

Bickel said alpha customers of HaaS have been running Hudson on Amazon's cloud.

Bickel was JBoss' vice president of strategy between 2002, working from its early days nipping at the heals of BEA Systems, IBM and Oracle to acquisition for $350m by Red Hat.

Labourey joined the JBoss project in 2001 as a core committer and became CTO in 2005. He was named co head of Red Hat's middleware division in 2007 and left Red Hat in 2009.

JBoss began as an open source Java-application server project under Marc Fleury in 1999 and quickly hit the mainstream, much to the annoyance of the industry's dominant Java application server and middleware vendors BEA, IBM, and Oracle.

JBoss gained appeal among developers because it offered them a flexible Java programming architecture, the code was open source and price was free.

This hurt BEA, IBM, and Oracle that charged developers to use their application servers while forbidding access to their code base and forcing them to consume monolithic architectures out of step with a shift towards Agile and modular development. Having got a foot in the door among developers, it wasn't long before JBoss spilled into deployment and the open source stack started running organization's entire web sites and services.

JBoss claimed 34 per cent market share by 2005.

Openness and free were double-edged swords, though, and JBoss' founders constantly looked for ways to convert their disruptive and popular application server into a profitable business.

Up to acquisition, JBoss attempted to surround the foundation application server with a set of charged-for middleware products and support services. JBoss was finally bought by Red Hat, but not before Fleury had talked to Oracle — apparently Oracle felt it might be better to have JBoss inside the tent for once. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
OpenBSD founder wants to bin buggy OpenSSL library, launches fork
One Heartbleed vuln was too many for Theo de Raadt
Got Windows 8.1 Update yet? Get ready for YET ANOTHER ONE – rumor
Leaker claims big release due this fall as Microsoft herds us into the CLOUD
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: Great changes, but sssh don't mention the...
Why HELLO Amazon! You weren't here last time
Patch iOS, OS X now: PDFs, JPEGs, URLs, web pages can pwn your kit
Plus: iThings and desktops at risk of NEW SSL attack flaw
Next Windows obsolescence panic is 450 days from … NOW!
The clock is ticking louder for Windows Server 2003 R2 users
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
Red Hat to ship RHEL 7 release candidate with a taste of container tech
Grab 'near-final' version of next Enterprise Linux next week
Apple inaugurates free OS X beta program for world+dog
Prerelease software now open to anyone, not just developers – as long as you keep quiet
prev story

Whitepapers

Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.