Feeds

Intel to get whacked in Q3 by PC slowdown

Competitive pressures, too?

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Wall Street got a shock this morning as chip maker Intel cut its guidance for the third quarter ending in September.

In a statement, Intel said that it was now expecting revenues to be somewhere between $10.8bn and $11.2bn, significantly lower than the $11.2bn to $12bn guidance that the company gave Wall Street back on July 13 when it reported its financial results for the second quarter. Ironically, Paul Otellini referred to that as "the best quarter in the company's 42-year history," and Intel beat Wall Street expectations for revenues and profits. It now seems pretty clear that PC and server makers might have been a little too exuberant in the chip and chipset buying in Q2 as they thought the IT market had recovered a bit more than it actually has.

"Revenue is being affected by weaker than expected demand for consumer PCs in mature markets," Intel said in its statement. "Inventories across the supply chain appear to be in-line with the company's revised expectations."

"The impact of lower volume is being partially offset by slightly higher average selling prices stemming from solid enterprise demand," it added.

As El Reg has previously reported, market watcher IDC calculated that PC shipments rose by 22.4 per cent in the second quarter, to 81.5 million units. IDC had been projecting that consumer PC spending will "remain healthy" but slow as 2010 progresses, and businesses will grow their PCs budgets as they do their cyclical replacements over the next couple of years.

Gartner said that the PC market jumped in the second quarter, too, with shipments up 20.9 per cent, with 82.9 million machines out the door. Microsoft, which is very keen on a Windows 7 upgrade cycle, was this month poo-pooing the idea that the PC market would slowdown in the second half of this year.

iSuppli, which tracks semiconductor sales, has been expecting worldwide chip sales to grow significantly this year - up 35.1 per cent, to $310.3bn. But that is because so many devices use chips these days and there are product shortages for them in many cases, which drives up revenues. Demand for PCs and servers were cooked into those iSuppli numbers, of course.

Intel also lowered its gross margin guidance by a couple of points, to between 65 and 67 per cent. Perhaps the Opteron 6100 processors for servers are getting a bit of traction in the market, after all.

As El Reg goes to press, Intel's shares are off a few pennies to $18.15 a pop. Wall Street either doesn't care or hasn't heard the news yet. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Hi-torque tank engines: EXTREME car hacking with The Register
Bentley found in a hedge gets WW2 lump insertion
Trousers down for six of the best affordable Androids
Stylish Googlephones for not-so-deep pockets
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
prev story

Whitepapers

10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity
IT teams can automatically detect problems across the IT environment, spot data theft, select unique pieces of transaction payloads to send to a data source, and more.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Business security measures using SSL
Examines the major types of threats to information security that businesses face today and the techniques for mitigating those threats.