Feeds

Regulator allows charging for uncounted TV text votes

If viewers are warned

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Broadcasters can charge people for TV text message votes received after voting has closed as long as the closing time is made clear to viewers, premium rate phone regulator PhonepayPlus (PPP) has said.

The regulator has updated rules (pdf) introduced in 2008 as a wave of phone vote scandals rocked the television industry. It said that broadcasters had asked it to clarify whether PPP's guidelines would force them to refund texters for messages received when lines had closed.

PPP has changed a number of the 2008 guidelines, and has said that no refunds need to be paid when viewers are informed that a voting or interaction procedure has a deadline and that messages must be paid for even after that deadline.

"It is acceptable for such invalid entries to be charged, provided that the risk of being charged for invalid entries is clearly communicated to the viewer; consumers whose votes/entries are invalid should be clearly informed that their entry is invalid and whether a charge has applied; [and] invalid entries have not been received after lines have been announced as closed as the result of technical failure," said the new guidance.

The new rules also amend the earlier demand that phone lines not remain open when programmes are repeated. The rules now say that phone lines can stay open during repeats as long as the votes received will still be counted.

The rules also stipulate that competition operators must allow enough time for all responses to be considered, even though this might result in different closing times for responses via different media.

"Where multiple entry platforms are used and different closure times apply, this must be clearly communicated to consumers during any call to action," said the new rules.

The rules govern the behaviour of TV producers who, since the rules' introduction in 2008, must first be cleared by PPP before offering any premium rate text voting services on their programmes.

The rules were introduced in 2008 after a string of scandals about vote rigging and misleading practices in TV competitions hit UK broadcasters. ITV was eventually fined £5.67m by media regulator Ofcom for abuse of premium-rate phone lines.

Copyright © 2010, OUT-LAW.com

OUT-LAW.COM is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
EE: STILL Blighty's best mobe network, says 'Frappucino' Moore
Fresh round of network stats fisticuffs possibly on the cards here
US TV stations bowl sueball directly at FCC's spectrum mega-sale
Broadcasters upset about coverage and cost as they shift up and down the dials
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?