Feeds

LG touts 'surprisingly productive' iPad killer

Novel feature: usefulness

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

LG says that its upcoming tablet, set for worldwide release before the end of this year, will compete against Apple's iPad by being, well, useful.

"It's going to be surprisingly productive," LG VP for mobile-device marketing Chang Ma told the Wall Street Journal. "Our tablet will be better than the iPad."

Ma told the WSJ that his company's tablet will focus not on content consumption, as does the iPad, but instead be a productivity device loaded with apps that support, for example, document writing and video editing.

LG's Optimus-branded tablet joins an ever-growing crowd of iPad-killer hopefuls, both announced and merely rumored:

  • RIM is rumored to be prepping a tablet called the BlackPad for launch in November at around $500.
  • Google is said to be developing a Chrome OS-based tablet that will hit retailers' shelves on the day after Thanksgiving — in the US only, however.
  • Acer's oft-rumored Android tablet, first said to be slated for release before the end of this year, has reportedly slipped to the first quarter of next year due to the company's decision to wait for Android 3.0.
  • Asus is said to be developing a tablet called — what else? — the Eee Pad, although whether it'll be a full-scale tablet or a color e-book reader is murky.
  • Toshiba's Australian managing director waved a prototype tablet at a company event, and said that either an Android or Windows 7 version would appear in September or October, with the other to follow.
  • Motorola has jumped on the Android 3.0–based tablet bandwagon as well, according to some sources.
  • Lenovo has reportedly confirmed that they have a tablet in the works called LePad, set for delivery by the end of the year.

And then there's the sad saga of Microsoft's Courier, which was killed before it was born.

Apple, the clear trend-setter in the tablet arena, isn't standing still. Recent rumors have Cupertino busily developing two new iPads — one with a seven-inch display and the other being an upgrade of the current 9.7-inch model, and both with snappier Cortex A9–based processors.

The Reg applauds LG's stated intent to make their tablet more conducive to productivity than is the iPad. Absent a clear differentiation from Apple's "magical and revolutionary" device, wannabe iPad killers may be doomed to the same fate as the horde of hopeful iPod-killers that were supposed to rip chunks of market share away from Cupertino's überpopular digital-music player.

That didn't happen — e.g., Microsoft's Zune. ®

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
Microsoft unsheathes cheap Android-killer: Behold, the Lumia 530
Say it with us: I'm King of the Landfill-ill-ill-ill
All those new '5G standards'? Here's the science they rely on
Radio professor tells us how wireless will get faster in the real world
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
US freemium mobile network eyes up Europe
FreedomPop touts 'free' calls, texts and data
'Two-speed internet' storm turns FCC.gov into zero-speed website
Deadline for comments on net neutrality shake-up extended to Friday
Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup
Just hook us up to more 10Gbps ports, backbone biz yells in tit-for-tat spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.