Feeds

WiMAX forum touts version 2. Again

If we build it someone will come. Won't they?

Website security in corporate America

The WiMAX forum has again announced that its version 2 specification will be available later this year, as it seems no-one was listening last time around.

The fact that the standard, technically 802.16m, would be finished this year was announced in January, and in April the WiMAX Forum said the specification would be ready on schedule, but no-one seemed to care. So the 'Forum has now announced that it will indeed be published in November.

And it's worked: Gizmodo readers are salivating at the idea of 1Gb/sec downloads, and Computerworld is talking about "when" the Clearwire network upgrades to version 2, rather than the slightly-more-realistic "if".

Clearwire has long been the WiMAX poster child, deploying the technology across the USA, but even Clearwire has gone cold on the technology lately, forcing the WiMAX forum to put a brave face on things.

"We don't think it would be detrimental if Clearwire decided to run both WiMax and LTE," the 'Forum told Computerworld, "In some ways it might be positive for both WiMax and LTE because it would take some of the sting out of the 'either-or' dynamic that a lot of people have been setting up when talking about the two technologies."

Even less welcome will be the attention of the Financial Times, which points out that Intel has dropped something in the region of $1.2bn promoting WiMAX, a technology on which it owns key patents. Patents are, as ever, what it's all about, and even Intel couldn't compete with the rest of the mobile industry which has so much money (and thus, patents) invested in LTE.

WiMAX won't die - there are fixed installations where it works well, and the technology will live on in vertical markets such as back hauling in-train Wi-Fi. But we're not going to see national WiMAX networks, regardless of how many versions of the standard are ratified, or how often we're told about them. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
Drag queens: Oh, don't be so bitchy, Facebook! Let us use our stage names
Handbags at dawn over free content ad network's ID policy
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.