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Craigslist 'killer' kills himself

Suspected prison suicide

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Philip Markoff, the man accused of using Craigslist to hire sex workers who he then attacked, has been found dead in his cell where he was awaiting trial.

Markoff was accused of the murder of Julissa Brisman at the Copley Marriott Hotel back in April 2009. He was also charged with the armed robbery of another woman who he also arranged to meet after seeing her advert for massage services on Craigslist.

Markoff was a 23-year-old medical student at the time and was seen on CCTV footage leaving the hotel shortly after the incident.

The case focused more attention on the seedier side of the free ads site, which was already under attack.

Just a month before, the sheriff of Chicago sued the site which he described as the US's number one source of prostitution.

Boston Police said Markoff was found alone and unresponsive in his cell on Sunday morning. Police said they were investigating his death but all the signs were it was suicide.

Markoff's death will also raise questions for prison officials - Markoff was put on suicide watch last year after a previous attempt. ®

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