Feeds

UK.gov to scrap new staff training rights

Clegg's Britain

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

The coalition has today announced plans to strip workers of new rights to request time off to improve their skills.

The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills said the move will help reduce the regulatory burden on employers. If implemented, 11 million workers will lose statutory protection for their training requests.

The "time to train" rights only came into force in April, for companies with more than 250 staff. The legislation was due to be extended to all employers in 2011.

It means businesses have a legal obligation to consider requests to pursue qualifications or develop new skills during working hours. They do not have to pay salary during the training, but may only refuse a request for a "good business reason".

The legislation is unpopular with employers, who in April claimed compliance would cost them £500m. The Institute of Directors, which lobbied against the new rights, branded them "unnecessary, poorly thought through and damaging".

The Labour government said it introduced "time to train" because too many employers failed to appreciate the value of training to the economy.

The Communication Workers Union today condemned plans to scrap the legislation.

There is strong evidence from TUC research that when people undertake learning at work it can improve productivity and reduce sickness absences, so this is a relatively small investment that can really pay off for employers," general secretary Billy Hayes said.

"With the reduction in courses offered at evening classes and in FE Colleges there are fewer and fewer opportunities for adults to take up learning. Often the workplace is the only place where those essential skills for employability – such as literacy, numeracy and IT - can be accessed."

An unusually brief consultation on scrapping the rights runs until 15 September. The coalition said the period for gathering external views had been shortened in order to meet the schedule of its "Reducing Regulation Committee", which includes ministers from across government. ®

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

More from The Register

next story
Airbus promises Wi-Fi – yay – and 3D movies (meh) in new A330
If the person in front reclines their seat, this could get interesting
UK Parliament rubber-stamps EMERGENCY data grab 'n' keep bill
Just 49 MPs oppose Drip's rushed timetable
Want to beat Verizon's slow Netflix? Get a VPN
Exec finds stream speed climbs when smuggled out
Samsung threatens to cut ties with supplier over child labour allegations
Vows to uphold 'zero tolerance' policy on underage workers
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
US freemium mobile network eyes up Europe
FreedomPop touts 'free' calls, texts and data
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
Price cuts, new features coming for Office 365 small biz customers
New plans for companies with up to 300 staff to launch in fall
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.