Feeds

EC probes Apple for anti-competitive antics

Joins FTC in monopoly pondering

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

It's not just the Federal Trade Commission that thinks Apple might be going all monopolistic - the European Commission is also taking a careful look into Cupertino's business.

The New York Post reports that the European Commission is working with its US equivalent, the FTC, to see if the practice of banning companies from iOS on the basis of their ability to compete with Apple (or its mates) is anti-competitive.

That's certainly how the iTunes application store looks from the outside. Bans on automatic porting technologies are one thing, and arguably unreasonable in themselves; but only applying them when the company has "adobe" in its name is hardly fair.

Companies such as Titanium and Grapple Mobile* have been happily getting ported applications into the store, in breach of a rule that now looks like it was imposed specifically to prevent Adobe's Flash slipping in.

Similarly, the ban on applications that interpret downloaded code is hard to justify, other than that it protects the vertical integration of the iTunes App Store. Allow someone to create a console emulator and they might start selling games direct - something Apple won't permit.

Apple claims that this is all in the interests of quality, and simplicity for its users, no matter how much it looks like Apple using its unprecedented level of control to shut out the competition. But even if the Commission agrees, it could decide that competition between suppliers is more important than either of those things. We'll find out in six months. ®

* Grapple has been on the phone to assure us they always play by Apple's rules, and would never consider converting anything to Objective C that wasn't originally written in Objective C.

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.