Feeds

University launches Google-gaming and Twitter course

A 'new paradigm for information searching'

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Exciting news from the world of academia, which is sweeping away old, elitist notions of learning and making itself more relevant by the day.

The University of Salford is launching a course in SEO (Search Engine Optimization) skills and how to game social networks such as Twitter and Facebook. The ten-week Search & Social Marketing Programme costs £1000 for the Foundation course or £1500 for the Professional course - or a bargain £2000 for both.

Students will learn about the "New Paradigm for Information Searching", a "Social Graph for Channels", and buying traffic ("Pay-per-click: if you need results fast").

"It’s the first in the UK to earn accreditation from the global leader the US-based SEMPO Institute," boasts the University, justifiably. There's no need to be bashful.

Tutors include private sector experts from Latitude and PushOn, experts in "holistic" SEO, viral marketing and pay-per-click, while in-house tutors include Dr David Kreps PhD, whose resume tells us that "his background in Cultural Studies and Sociology bring an Actor Network and Performativity oriented approach to his research in Information Solutions".

The University already teaches a Master of Arts Degree in Social Media, but it wasn't the first to do so - it was beaten to the punch by Birmingham City University. (See I CAN HAZ TWITTER DEGREE.)

As educational institutions face public funding cuts, they're increasingly looking for new sources of income. One that seems to too lucrative to resist is the world of Web 2.0 marketing; the buzzword brigade who enthuse about Malcolm Gladwell books also have large budgets and a deep sense of insecurity - they have no idea what they're doing.

It's a marriage of nature's natural bureaucrats. Which makes it a perfect fit.

The marketers gain a valuable, officially-blessed hierarchy: their jargon becoming a formally institutionalised language, while their in-house guild becomes the academic authority. For their part, the Universities become increasingly loath to teach the economics or history behind the ideas of Web 2.0 (which owe much to Californian New Age cults, for example) that they're promoting. Already reduced to certificate-mills, they see their authority diminish further.

So in the end, no one really learns anything. The successful students are less able to understand the internet or business than if they hadn't taken the course. Their employers are £2,000 worse off, of course - a cost ultimately borne by you and me. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Are you a fat boy? Get to university NOW, you PENNILESS SLACKER
Rotund types paid nearly 20% less than people who didn't eat all the pies
Emma Watson should SHUT UP, all this abuse is HER OWN FAULT
... said an anon coward who we really wish hadn't posted on our website
Japan develops robot CHEERLEADERS which RIDE on BALLS
'Will put smiles on faces worldwide', predicts corporate PR chief
Bruges Booze tubes to pump LOVELY BEER underneath city
Belgian booze pumped from underground
Oz carrier Tiger Air takes terror alerts to new heights
Don't doodle, it might cost you your flight
Amazon: Wish in one hand, Twit in the other – see which one fills first
#AmazonWishList A year's supply of Arran scotch, ta
Let it go, Steve: Ballmer bans iPads from his LA Clippers b-ball team
Can you imagine the scene? 'Hey guys, it's your new owner – WTF is that on your desk?'
Oi, London thief. We KNOW what you're doing - our PRECRIME system warned us
Aye, shipmate, it be just like that Minority Report
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.