Feeds

Google Slides away from Wave FAIL with social network buy

In your Facebook... bitch

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Google has bought social network tech outfit Slide for an undisclosed sum in its latest effort to tackle Facebook’s Web2.0 dominance.

The buy came just 48 hours after Google killed its Wave tool, which made a splash landing in May 2009. But within a year of its birth, the email-IM-and-everything-else-Web-2.0-splatter-gun platform had proved itself to be an unpopular product that no one wanted to play with.

Last week Google boss Eric Schmidt hinted that the ad broker was beavering away at a social networking site that it hoped might, one day, unseat Facebook.

"We liked the [Wave user interface] and we liked a lot of the new features in it [but] didn't get enough traction, so we are taking those technologies and applying them to new technologies that are not announced," he said hours after the firm declared the death of Wave.

Fast forward to last Friday, and Google had acquired Slide. It’s not clear if this was the new tech Schmidt alluded to in his statement, but the company certainly fits the bill in terms of Mountain View’s needs right now.

“For Google, the web is about people, and we’re working to develop open, transparent and interesting (and fun!) ways to allow our users to take full advantage of how technology can bring them closer to friends and family and provide useful information just for them,” said the firm’s engineering director David Glazer.

“Slide has already created compelling social experiences for tens of millions of people across many platforms, and we’ve already built strong social elements into products like Gmail, Docs, Blogger, Picasa and YouTube.

"As the Slide team joins Google, we’ll be investing even more to make Google services socially aware and expand these capabilities for our users across the web.”

According to Reuters Google paid $182m for Slide, alongside $46m in staff retention bonuses.

The Chocolate Factory hasn’t announced any specifics about how Slide’s tech will be melded into its products. Google has already confirmed that its creepy, privacy-lite Buzz is here to stay in Gmail.

Whether Slide’s offerings will similarly be bolted on the company’s free web mail service remains to be seen.

Of course, Google might just be planning another attempt at pure social networking, but it’s hardly an area the company has had much success with – yet. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.