Feeds

Upgraded iPads, iPhone, and Apple TV reported

Verizon iPhone closes Antennagate

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Post Antennagate iPhones

Last but certainly not least among Monday's rumor trifecta is DigiTimes' claim that a CDMA-based iPhone is in the works, and that it will be built with "a back plate [that] will be forged from metal materials and will feature an integrated antenna" — an interesting detail, if true, considering that Apple chief executive Steve Jobs insisted that "there is no Antennagate" when defending the iPhone 4's unique exposed-antenna design during a press conference last month.

As to whether those "metal materials" will be the "amorphous, non-crystalline" metal alloys for which AppleInsider says Apple has obtained "a perpetual, worldwide, fully-paid, exclusive license" isn't known — or even rumored.

As The Reg has reported in multiple articles, rumors of a CDMA-based iPhone have popped up repeatedly since as early as September 2008. In the US, this mythical beast is identified as the "Verizon iPhone" due to the fact that the largest stateside mobile-phone service provider, Verizon Wireless, uses CDMA technology, and not the GSM-based alphabet soup of the iPhone's current exclusive US provider, AT&T.

Monday's rumor states that the CDMA iPhone will be manufactured by Taiwan's Pegatron, offered by both Verizon Wireless and China Telecom, and will be revealed to world+dog at January's CES 2011.

For American iPhone owners, a Verizon-supplied iPhone will be a welcome addition to their choices of providers of the Jobsian handset. According to a recent small-scale survey by ChangeWay Research, when iPhone owners were asked: "What do you dislike most about your iPhone 4?", the number-one complaint was "requirement to Use AT&T's Network", followed closely by "coverage/speed/quality of AT&T's 3G network".

What's more, according to ChangeWave, AT&T's service is deteriorating: "Since September 2008," they wrote in their report, "Verizon's [dropped-call] rating has improved slightly while AT&T's has continued to worsen."

If Monday's DigiTimes report is correct, US fanbois may soon have a choice of carriers. Having followed the Verizon iPhone's long trail of fruitless rumors, however, The Reg remains skeptical — but we'll be at CES 2011 with our fingers crossed. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Will BlackBerry make a comeback with its SQUARE smartphones?
Plus PC PIMs from company formerly known as RIM
Apple's iPhone 6 first-day sales are MEANINGLESS, mutters analyst
Big weekend queues only represent fruity firm's supply
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
Soundbites: News in brief from the Wi-Fi audiophile files
DTS and Sonos sing out but not off the same hymnsheet
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.