Feeds

Alleged ring leader extradited in $9.4m RBS WorldPay heist

Like taking candy from a baby

Security for virtualized datacentres

Federal prosecutors say they have have extradited one of the leaders of an international crime ring accused of hacking in to bank card processor RBS WorldPay and stealing more than $9.4m in a 12-hour period.

Sergei Tsurikov, 26, of Tallinn, Estonia, was recently brought to the US, after being arrested in Russia in March. On Friday, he appeared in federal court in Atlanta, where according to the Associated Press he pleaded not guilty to charges that included conspiracy, wire fraud, computer fraud, and aggravated identity theft.

He and seven alleged accomplices were indicted in November and accused of carrying out a highly sophisticated attack on RBS WorldPay, an Atlanta-based unit of the Royal Bank of Scotland. They allegedly exploited a vulnerability to break into the company's network, where they retrieved payment card data as it was being processed.

They then obtained data for 44 payment cards, most of which were issued by a financial institution known as the Palm Desert National Bank. Over 12 hours on November 8, withdrawals made at more than 2,100 ATM terminals located in 280 cities in the US, Ukraine, Italy, Hong Kong, and elsewhere siphoned more than $9m from the accounts. The ring employed a large number of “cashers” who used card clones to withdraw money from ATMs and were permitted to pocket about 30 to 50 percent of the take.

Tsurikov and accused accomplice Viktor Pleschuk, 29, of St. Petersburg, Russia, allegedly monitored the fraudulent ATM withdrawals in real-time from within the compromised computer systems.

The 16-count indictment also accused Pleschuk; Oleg Covelin, 29; of Chisinau, Moldova; and an unidentified individual with the same offenses. Igor Grudijev, 32; Ronald Tsoi, 32; Evelin Tsoi, 21; and Mihhail Jevgenov, 34; each of Tallinn, Estonia, were also charged with access device fraud.

If convicted, Tsurikov faces 20 years for conspiracy to commit wire fraud and each wire fraud count; up to five years for conspiracy to commit computer fraud; up to five or 10 years for each count of computer fraud; a two-year mandatory minimum sentence for aggravated identity theft; and fines up to $3.5 million dollars. Prosecutors are also seeking forfeiture of the $9.4 million in proceeds from the alleged crimes. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for
It's on by default – didn't you read the small print?
Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
NOT OK GOOGLE: Android images can conceal code
It's been fixed, but hordes won't have applied the upgrade
Edward who? GCHQ boss dodges Snowden topic during last speech
UK spies would rather 'walk' than do 'mass surveillance'
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.