Feeds

Beatles on iTunes? 'Don't hold your breath' says Yoko

The long and winding road

The essential guide to IT transformation

John Lennon's widow has put the kibosh on rumors that Apple Corps' Beatles catalog might arrive on Apple Inc's iTunes online music store anytime soon.

"Don't hold your breath ... for anything," Yoko Ono was quoted as saying in an interview with Reuters when asked about the Beatles joining the Jobsian CD-killer.

Rumors of the loveable moptops' oeuvre arriving on Apple's überpopular music-distribution cash cow have popped up repeatedly since that service launched, Beatleless, in April 2003.

After announcing in 2007 that EMI's catalog — which includes the Beatles — was going DRM-free on iTunes, Apple CEO Steve Jobs was asked when the Fab Four would join the download party. His answer: "I wanna know that too." EMI's CEO Eric Nicoli added that his company was "working on it."

Later that same year, Sir Paul McCartney told Billboard: "It's all happening soon. Most of us are all sort of ready. The whole thing is primed, ready to go — there's just maybe one little sticking point left, and I think it's being cleared up as we speak, so it shouldn't be too long."

How long, Macca? "It's down to fine-tuning, but I'm pretty sure it'll be happening next year, 2008," the left-handed Hofner owner opined. Well, 2008 came and 2008 went, and apparently they could not work it out.

In 2009, after Sky News reported and then unreported that the Beatles' arrival on iTunes was imminent, EMI's catalog prez told the Financial Times: "Conversations between Apple and EMI are ongoing and we look forward to the day when we can make the music available digitally. But it's not tomorrow." Or the next day. Or the next day.

Earlier this year, Sir Paul told BBC's Newsbeat that the delay impasse was all EMI's fault: "It's been business hassles," he said. "Not with us, or iTunes. It's the people in the middle, the record label. There have been all sorts of reasons why they don't want to do it."

An EMI rep snapped back at the former Quarryman, telling Newsbeat: "Discussions are ongoing. We would love to see The Beatles' music available for sale digitally."

Maybe so, but we advise taking Ms. Ono's advice: "Don't hold your breath." ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.