Feeds

Brussels delays data protection reforms

Complex overhaul

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

The European Commission has effectively pushed back plans to overhaul the Data Protection Directive by up to a year under pressure from national regulators.

Commissioner Viviane Reding said in March that she would publish her legislative proposals by the end of this year, but that deadline has now been abandoned. Instead, this year the Commission will merely outline its plans for action later.

"This will be the first step for a legislative proposal that will then follow in the course of the next 10 months," a spokeswoman told The Register.

French media have reported that their equivalent of the Information Commissioner's Office, CNIL, told Reding that her original timetable to revise the directive was unrealistic. She met national regulators on July 14, at a meeting of their Article 29 Working Group.

"The revision will be done in very close cooperation with the national data protection authorities because they are the ones who have to enforce EU data protection rules in their countries," her spokeswoman said today.

The Data Protection Directive is now 15 years old, and was conceived long before mass internet adoption. Reding has proposed an extensive revamp to take account of recent technologies such as social networking, cloud computing and behavioural advertising.

She also wants to bring use and sharing of personal data by law enforcement agencies under normal data protection legislation. Such activity is currently governed by separate "third pillar" laws that mean the Commission has no enforcement powers when abuses are revealed.

The Commission is currently considering 160 responses to a data protection consultation before proceeding on its new schedule.

"It is important to have high/quality legislation at European level that sets 'gold' standards for Europe's citizens when it comes to the protection of their data," it said. ®

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
Adam Afriyie MP: Smart meters are NOT so smart
Mega-costly gas 'n' 'leccy totting-up tech not worth it - Tory MP
'Blow it up': Plods pop round for chat with Commonwealth Games tweeter
You'd better not be talking about the council's housing plans
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable
Learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.