Feeds

Apathy kills Google's new-age Wave

Idea unappreciated beyond the Googleplex

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Google is closing down development of its new-age communications platform Wave due to lack of interest.

The Chocolate Factory said Wednesday that it's stopping development of Wave as a stand-alone product because of a lack of user adoption.

The Wave site is being put on life support until the end of the year, with the technology extended for use in "other" Google projects. Google has promised to deliver tools that let early adopters extract their data and content from Wave implementations.

Greybeard partners such as Novell and SAP who though they could look cool by hanging ten on Google's Wave have been told they can keep using the more than 40,000 lines of code that has been released under open source — code for drag-and-drop and character-by-character live typing.

Sure, nothing like surfing once you've lost the wave, dude.

Google Wave, an email/IM/document-sharing/real-time-thingummy, was unveiled to a standing ovation at the company's I/O conference in San Francisco in May 2009.

Seems like the Googlers were more excited about whatever Google Wave was than were those outside the Mountain View Factory.

Senior vice president of operations and Google fellow Urs Hölzle admitted in a blog here: "We were equally jazzed about Google Wave internally, even though we weren't quite sure how users would respond to this radically different kind of communication."

Google vice president of engineering Vic Gundotra, who announced the tool in 2009 and was reported Wednesday to be preparing to lead Google's fight against Facebook, had called Wave an unbelievable demonstration of what is possible in the browser.

"You will forget you are looking at a browser," he concluded.

Instead, most people left I/O and forgot about Wave.

There were the standard invitation-only offers to participate in testing Wave, with some people actually spending money on invitations. What quickly followed, though, was the realization that Wave was something that was as difficult to understand as it was to make work — even for Googlers. The company created a complex architecture of robots and wavelets with new communications protocols all heavily dependent on the as-yet-unfinished HTML5.

If there was a roadmap, it wasn't evident: Google last month released Splash, Wave-client code to view Wave content on sites using the still-dominant web browser Internet Explorer, having earlier said that IE users could stick with Chrome Frame instead.

Further, Spash didn't work with Wave's FedOne communications protocols — that was supposed to happen in three months time, Google told OSCON in late June when it was still pimping Wave and appealing to open sourcers to start coding.

With all that new code and all those moving parts, Wave crashed: it was crashing in demos last November, six months after Wave was unleashed, and it was still crashing a year later at OSCON. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?