Show geo-data some respect, don't rely on Web2.0 data

Survey kicks hive brain into touch

Public sector and private organisations in the UK have thumbed their noses at data derived from Web2.0 pushers and information sourced from the, er, wisdom of crowds.

A joint survey, conducted by the Association for Geographic Information (AGI) and PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLP, of around 100 UK private and public sector outfits found that the most useful geo-data unsurprisingly came from more traditional sources.

National or pan-European mapping agency data was identified as the handiest source at 27 per cent. National public sector data holdings scored 22 per cent, followed by an org’s own data holdings, according to the survey.

“Crowd sourced data, commercial data providers and ‘Web2.0’ data providers such as Google and OpenStreet Map failed to impress,” it noted.

The survey warned that organisations needed to have adequate data strategies in place.

“The value of geo-data is increasing, now that organisations are facing and making tougher choices. They are seeing data as an important asset to inform these choices. Data relating to place, what we call ‘geo-data’, is at the heart of every business or government department and enables the right choices to be made to increase operational efficiency and to focus on delivering effective frontline services,” said PwC’s Simon Doyle.

“Worryingly, a lack of a data strategy can lead to inefficient storage and retrieval of information; higher cost, as data is purchased more than once or not re-used, and also the inaccurate understanding and interpretation of that information within decision making processes.”

All of which reassuringly has little to do with crowds and wisdom and such. ®

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