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Sky turns 3D on Oct 1

Strong sports line-up. And golf

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Sky is launching a 3D TV channel, Europe's first, on October 1.

To see it you have to be a Sky HD subscriber with a 3D-ready TV. No set-top box adjustments or additional fees necessary. The satellite TV broadcaster says the channel works with active and passive 3D formats and is compatible with "all of the TVs" being introduced by Sony, Samsung, LG and Panasonic.

Sport and movies are the main draws.

The launch weekend includes three days live coverage of the Ryder Cup, a must for many, a big yawn for most. Premier League football will also showcase on the channel.

The launch film line up includes Bolt and Monster vs. Aliens. Coming down the line are Alice in Wonderland; Ice Age – Dawn of the Dinosaurs; Coraline; Fly Me To The Moon, Harry Potter & The Half Blood Prince and My Bloody Valentine.

Sky has fooled around with 3D for a while now, showing 3D versions of sports events since April at more than 1,500 pubs and clubs in the UK and Ireland.

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