Feeds

.NET for Android prepares to get probed

Port from Windows help

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Microsoft's .NET for Android - dubbed MonoDroid - has come a step closer.

The Novell-backed MonoTouch project is about to start beta tests of a version of its open-source implementation of Microsoft's framework for use on Google's Linux operating system for devices.

Final product for MonoDroid is expected in the fall, Novell Mono product manager Joseph Hill told The Reg – around the time of the next installment in Microsoft's Windows phone story: Windows Phone 7, due in October.

Hill said interest from developers in MonoTouch on Android has grown to the point where Novell thinks it's finally time to justify porting the code.

The idea behind MonoTouch for Android is Windows Phone programmers can potentially cut down the work involved in porting their mobile apps to yet another non-Microsoft platform. MonoTouch for Android follows in the mechanized footsteps of MonoTouch for Apple's iPhone and iPad.

"You won't be able to share everything, but you can share business logic and take applications to this new platform. It's compelling when you think about Windows Phone 7 is around the corner," Hill said.

MonoTouch for the iPhone and iPad lets Microsoft coders build using C# and .NET APIs and bindings, with a static compiler turning .NET executables and libraries into native applications. MonoTouch was built for touch-based smartphone apps, and came out of the existing Mono Project started by Miguel de Icaza to put .NET on Unix and Linux.

Novell, meanwhile, is today expected to announce availability of an updated version of its Mono Tools plug in to Microsoft's Visual Studio IDE.

Mono Tools for Visual Studio 2.0 now works on the Mac and non-x86 architectures such as PowerPC and 390x with the addition of a completely new soft debugger replacing the earlier hard debugger that only worked on Linux. The suite has also been updated to work with Visual Studio 2010, so also runs on Windows, and works with Red Hat Linux packages.

Mono Tools for Visual Studio 2.0 comes as a Professional Edition priced $99 for individuals, Enterprise Edition for one developer in an organization priced $249, and Ultimate Edition for $2,499 that includes a limited commercial license to redistribute Mono on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X and comes with five enterprise developer licenses.

All versions include a one-year subscription for product updates. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
SLURP! Flick your TONGUE around our LOLLIPOP – Google
Android 5 is coming – IF you're lucky enough to have the right gadget
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Internet Security Threat Report 2014
An overview and analysis of the year in global threat activity: identify, analyze, and provide commentary on emerging trends in the dynamic threat landscape.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.