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Virgin cables up Pot Noodle place via power poles

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Do you live in the Welsh village of Crumlin, Caerphilly? Then you may well be getting fast broadband next month, delivered via the town's many power poles.

Virgin Media today said it had selected the settlement - population 5724, welcomes careful drivers - to play host to its trial of the technology, which will see fibre-optic cable strung up between said pillars, which are owned by local power company Western Power Distribution.

Virgin is working on the project with telco Surf Telecoms which just so happens to be owned by WPD.

The ISP said it will offer townsfolk 50Mb/s broaband. The trial will run into 2011.

The scheme follows one initiated by Virgin in April in the Berkshire village of Woolhampton. There, the ISP is cabling up homes by running its cables over telegraph poles.

Crumlin best known as being home to Golden Wonder's Pot Noodle factory, which has been in operation for more than 30 years. According to owner Unilever, the plant punches out 155 million pot of the instant meal - a firm geek favourite - every year. ®

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