Feeds

Canonical fluffs one-click Ubuntu cloud stack

Linux, NoSQL, Hadoop – check

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Canonical is accelerating Ubuntu's push into the cloud, delivering an integrated stack of cloud platforms ready for download.

Canonical has revealed that it's working with open-source project Hadoop and NoSQL database providers to deepen the level of integration between these big-data technologies and the Linux distro's next planned release: Maverick Meerkat, aka Ubuntu 10.10, due in October.

Separately, sources close to Canonical have told The Reg that the company is in talks with Cassandra and CouchDB on NoSQL, and start-up PuppetLabs for data-center automation and provisioning.

Canonical also has an internal project underway codenamed Ensemble to manage dependencies, deployment, and provisioning of applications on Ubuntu clouds.

Data center and application tooling will come in the follow-on Ubuntu 11.04 and 11.10 releases.

Canonical's end goal seems to be single-click deployment for a cloud from the Ubuntu command line, starting with specific applications.

Neil Levine, vice president of Canonical's corporate services division, said in an interview here with Dell's cloud-computing evangelist Barton George that Ubuntu is moving up the stack and bringing the earlier work on integration between Ubuntu and Eucalyptus to other applications for "deeper integration and slickness" in Ubuntu 10.10.

Canonical is targeting Hadoop and NoSQL – used by hyperscale providers like Yahoo! and Facebook – believing ordinary businesses are now ready to start use them for data processing and analytics.

"Business is beginning to use this kind of stuff now," Levine said. "We are trying to integrate those in [Cassandra and Hadoop] so you can run those kinds of applications on top of the public cloud using Amazon or in private cloud using UEC [Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud], so you can get easy access to those applications and plug them into the problem you have."

The push tightens Ubuntu's embrace of cloud. Building on initial support for Amazon Machine Images (AMIs) that contain applications, libraries, data, and configuration, Ubuntu has bundled Eucalyptus for Amazon-style elastic compute and storage on the server.

The focus on frameworks, applications, and application management means Ubuntu is buying into the concept of deploy-anywhere cloud computing.

Unlike VMware with vSphere and chief Linux rival Red Hat using KVM, Ubuntu's cloud stack does not seem to be anchoring itself in a virtualization layer that can tie in apps.

Instead, Ubuntu's focus is on ease of deployment, whether that's on a public Amazon cloud, private Amazon-like cloud, or on a mixed server infrastructure that does include virtualization from VMware and Red Hat.

Despite the hype over its ability to scale and its number-crunching potential, Eucalyptus is difficult for ordinary users to set up and rollout. By integrating Eucalyptus with Ubuntu, Canonical hopes to solve this for Ubuntu clouds.

A further plus of integration, meanwhile, would be that Canonical can provide customers commercial support for Hadoop, Cassandra, and CouchDB. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Euro Parliament VOTES to BREAK UP GOOGLE. Er, OK then
It CANNA do it, captain.They DON'T have the POWER!
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Post-Microsoft, post-PC programming: The portable REVOLUTION
Code jockeys: count up and grab your fabulous tablets
Twitter App Graph exposes smartphone spyware feature
You don't want everyone to compile app lists from your fondleware? BAD LUCK
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
prev story

Whitepapers

10 ways wire data helps conquer IT complexity
IT teams can automatically detect problems across the IT environment, spot data theft, select unique pieces of transaction payloads to send to a data source, and more.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Mitigating web security risk with SSL certificates
Web-based systems are essential tools for running business processes and delivering services to customers.