Feeds

Novell opens Linux appliance gallery

Not quite the Apple App Store

High performance access to file storage

Novell has opened an online gallery for SUSE software appliances.

It has been a year since Novell launched its SUSE Appliance Program, which offers a set of online tools, dubbed SUSE Studio, for spinning up software appliances based on its SUSE Linux distro. The appliance tools were aimed at software developers who wanted to code appliances for their own purposes – perhaps as a means of more easily supporting and redistributing their own application software to their customers – not for distributing software appliances to the general public.

But that is precisely what some software developers want to be able to do, according to Joanna Rosenberg, ISV marketing manager at Novell, and so on the first birthday of the SUSE Appliance Program, Novell is opening up what it calls the SUSE Gallery. Now, when ISVs or individual developers create a software appliance using SUSE Studio, they can decide to keep that appliance under wraps in their private account or set it free for others to download and use in the SUSE Gallery.

Don't get the wrong impression. SUSE Gallery is not the the Apple App Store, and Peter Bowen, the architect of the SUSE Appliance Program, says Novell has no plans to turn it into a place where Novell collects money as software firms and individual developers peddle their appliances. Novell's intent for the SUSE Studio tools was to help developers make and support software appliances, and then negotiate a custom volume support agreement based on what they created and who they are selling it to with Novell as they distribute their products using customized SUSE Linux stacks. The idea is to integrate custom appliances into the Yast Online support mechanisms that regular SUSE Linux licenses use to keep updated.

Novell has not said how much money – if any – SUSE Studio has driven through these appliance support contracts. Market watcher IDC is projecting that the software appliance market will grow to $1.18bn by 2012, and Novell could get an infrastructure slice of that.

Over 80,000 registered users have built a total of 415,000 software appliances in the past year, so SUSE Studio is getting plenty of action. (Novell says that 5,000 ISVs have signed up to play with SUSE Studio). The hope, says Rosenberg, is that developers will want to show off their code in the SUSE Gallery and help fuel the idea of using software appliances.

So far, there are about 175 appliances in the SUSE Gallery, which you can see here and which were added during the private beta for the tool. The site has a search engine to help you plow through what could be an immense number of software appliances within a matter of months.

The way SUSE Studio works now, it creates a complete binary software stack, including the bits of SUSE Linux needed to run the application and whatever desktop or server virtualization (if any) the developer employs. ISVs and developers do not have to distribute their source code when they pop things into the SUSE Gallery, but they can link out to their source code if they want, giving appliance users full access to the code so they can make their own modifications and perhaps create a derivative appliance.

To help get people keen on showing off their appliances, Novell is ponying up $20,000 to give to appliance makers; $10,000 each to a community and a commercial appliance maker. Markus Rex, the general manager of open products at Novell, and a team of independent judges will choose who has created the best appliances. The contest ends on September 30. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.