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Motorola making Android 3.0 tablet

Platform emerging?

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Motorola is the latest company to have its name associated with an upcoming - well, Q4 at the earliest - Android-based tablet computer.

Like the others - from Acer, Asus, Lenovo, LG, Toshiba and co - Motorola's offering will sport a 10in display and run Android 3.0 - aka 'Gingerbread'.

What little we know about comes from TheStreet.com, which admits the spec is "not yet established". But it's not hard to guess: 1024 x 600 touchscreen, 1GHz CPU, 16-32GB of Flash storage.

There's clearly a pattern to all this, with vendors like Motorola now viewing Android as a standard platform for tablets in the way they view Windows as the standard for desktop and laptops computers. The advantage to the Google OS: it's free.

All will go up against Apple's iOS-powered iPad, and undoubtedly take Android's share of tablet market above Apple's. Android will be lauded, but not of its supporters will as their individual shares will be lower than Apple's, much as we're seeing in the smartphone market. ®

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