Feeds

Apple sued over hot iPad shutdowns

Cold blooded tablet

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Apple's iPad can shut down if it gets too hot, and Jacob Baltazar, Claudia Keller, and John Browning are as mad as hell and aren't going to take it anymore.

Those unhappy iPadders have filed suit against Apple — and they're asking the court to elevate their claim to class-action status.

Their lawsuit, filed in the US District Court, Northern District of California, alleges that "the iPad overheats so quickly under common weather conditions that it does not function for prolonged use either outdoors, or in many other warm conditions."

Your Reg reporter notes that his iPad has never suffered from this alleged failing — although he hastens to add that during this typically frigid summer in fog-bound San Francisco, "warm conditions" are few and far between.

Baltazar et al are miffed that "the iPad is virtually unusable when sitting in particular environmental conditions (e.g., in direct sunlight with virtually any ambient air temperature) since it turns off, sometimes after just a few minutes of use."

The suit snippily observes that "according to the www.apple.com website, '[r]reading on iPad is just like reading a book.' However, contrary to this promise, using the iPad is not 'just like reading a book' at all since books do not close when the reader is enjoying them in the sunlight or in other normal environmental environments. This promise, like other portions of APPLE's marketing material for the iPad, is false."

The Reg pauses to consider the lovely phrase "environmental environments", then moves on...

The complaint asks for no specific damages, but otherwise leaves few legal stones unturned: relief is sought based on ten "Causes of Action", including fraud, negligent misrepresentation, deceptive advertising practices, unjust enrichment, breach of both express and implied warranties, and violations of California's Consumer Legal Remedies, Unfair Competition, and Song-Beverly Consumer Warranty acts.

The plaintiffs' lawyers, Scott Cole & Associates, are similarly fastidious in bolstering their case: they've set up a website called — what else? — ipadoverheating.com, to troll for more complainants. If your iPad is taking a dive when you use it under the summer sun, feel free to join the crusade.

Or not. As MacDailyNews reminds us, the iPad's "Important Product Information Guide" advises, with tradition Cupertinian disregard for both definite and indefinite articles: "Operate iPad in a place where the temperature is between 0° and 35° C (32° to 95° F). Low- or high-temperature conditions might temporarily shorten battery life or cause iPad to temporarily stop working properly."

We'll leave it to the wisdom of the court to decide: fraud, caveat emptor, or simply RTFM? ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
WTF happened to Pac-Man?
In his thirties and still afraid of ghosts
Reg man builds smart home rig, gains SUPREME CONTROL of DOMAIN – Pics
LightwaveRF and Arduino: Bright ideas for dim DIYers
Leaked pics show EMBIGGENED iPhone 6 screen
Fat-fingered fanbois rejoice over Chinternet snaps
Apple patent LOCKS drivers out of their OWN PHONES
I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't let you text that
Microsoft signs Motorola to Android patent pact – no, not THAT Motorola
The part that Google never got will play ball with Redmond
Slip your finger in this ring and unlock your backdoor, phone, etc
Take a look at this new NFC jewellery – why, what were you thinking of?
Happy 25th birthday, Game Boy!
Monochrome handset ushered in modern mobile gaming era
Rounded corners? Pah! Amazon's '3D phone has eye-tracking tech'
Now THAT'S what we call a proper new feature
prev story

Whitepapers

Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.