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Samsung UE46C8000

Samsung UE46C8000 3D TV

Picture perfect?

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7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration

Review Samsung got the 3D ball rolling earlier this year when its C7000 became the first 3D TV to hit the shops in the UK. However, the more expensive C8000 is the one that really turned my head. Even if you dismiss the 3D option as a novelty the C8000 is simply a superb flat-screen TV.

Samsung UE46C8000

Samsung's UE46C8000: a great viewing experience in any dimension

It’s not cheap, coming in at around £2200 for this 46in model – maybe a little cheaper if you shop around online – but the sleek design, impressive image quality, and wide range of features give it the ‘wow’ factor that sets your credit card a-trembling.

The streamlined LED back-lit panel is a mere 23.9mm thick, and finished off with a stylish metal-and-glass bezel. The whole unit is mounted on an eye-catching silvery ‘quad stand’, and even the brushed metal finish of the remote control merits an admiring glance.

The slimline design does have one disadvantage, though. The four HDMI interfaces are all normal size, but most of the other ports and connectors have been miniaturized, which means that you have to tear open a big bag full of adaptors – or ‘slim gender cables’ as Samsung calls them – simply to plug in the Ethernet cable and even the aerial for the Freeview HD tuner. As a result, the back panel does end up looking a bit of a mess, with unsightly black plastic adaptors dangling from various ports.

However, all is forgiven when you go up-front again and look at the screen. Turn it on and the C8000 welcomes you with a happy chime, swiftly followed by a bright and boldly coloured image that really shines when you switch to high-definition content on BBC HD.

Samsung UE46C8000

Slimline styling demands various adapters to hook up to miniaturised interface ports

You’ve got plenty of control over the image too. In addition to presets for specific tasks such as watching movies, the on-screen menu system provides individual controls for settings such as brightness, contrast, sharpness, tint and tone, motion blur and judder reduction. There’s also a handy on-screen help display that gives a brief description of each setting for less experienced users.

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